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    1. African American Attorney Inducted Into Prestigious Society for Accomplished Professionals

      African American Attorney Inducted Into Prestigious Society for Accomplished Professionals

      Attorney Zulu Ali has been inducted into Marquis Who’s Who for Excellence in Law and Activism. Since 1898, Marquis Who’s Who has recognized accomplished and prominent professionals in its biographical publications. As in all Marquis Who’s Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.

       Zulu Ali is a practicing trial attorney, businessman, social commentator, and activist. A former police officer and U.S. Marine Corps veteran, he earned a doctorate in law (J.D.) from Trinity International University; a Masters in Administration of Justice (M.S.) and business (M.B ...
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      Mentions: Human Rights
    2. Two African Americans Chosen to Lead Colleges in New York System

      Two African Americans Chosen to Lead Colleges in New York System

      City University of New York‘s board of trustees recently voted to appoint two African American scholars to lead colleges in the university system, according to jbhe.comBerenecea Johnson Eanes was appointed president of York College of the City University of New York. She has worked as interim president there since last fall.

      York College, located in Jamaica, Queens, enrolls nearly 8,500 undergraduate students, according to the latest data supplied to the U.S. Department of Education. African Americans make up 38 percent of the student body.

      Dr. Eanes has previously served as vice president for the Division of Student Affairs at California State University, Fullerton and had been on the staff at Cal State Fullerton for seven ...

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    3. WHO Finally Acknowledges Possibility of COVID-19 Airborne Transmission

      WHO Finally Acknowledges Possibility of COVID-19 Airborne Transmission

      The World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday heeded calls from more than 200 scientists, who urged the global health authority to acknowledge that COVID-19 may spread by air.

      Previously, the WHO said contact with large respiratory droplets, like those expelled in a sick person’s cough or sneeze, appeared to be the primary way COVID-19 spreads. But in a highly publicized letter published earlier this week, a large group of scientists argued the WHO’s guidance neglected to adequately address another important route of transmission: inhaling tiny respiratory particles generated by a sick person, which can remain suspended in the air indoors for hours.

      In a scientific brief published Thursday, the WHO allowed that “short-range aerosol transmission, particularly in specific ...

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      Mentions: top story
    4. Fauci Bluntly Reports Failures in US Coronavirus Response

      Fauci Bluntly Reports Failures in US Coronavirus Response

      Top US infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci gave a blunt assessment of how the United States is handling the coronavirus pandemic compared to other countries.

      Some cities, he said, were following the guidelines and controlling their outbreaks. "But as a country, when you compare us to other countries, I don't think you can say we're doing great," Fauci told the FiveThirtyEight podcast. "I mean, we're just not." Part of that has to do with how states, cities, and their populations have responded to the pandemic, he said, whether that was opening up too quickly or ignoring social distancing guidelines and calls to wear masks.

      In another interview, Fauci also discussed the particular conditions of the virus ...

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    5. Over 80% of Young People May Be Asymptomatic, Study Shows

      Over 80% of Young People May Be Asymptomatic, Study Shows

      Experts from the Bruno Kessler Foundation in Trento, Italy, in collaboration with colleagues affiliated to the ATS Lombardy COVID-19 Task Force and various research institutions, conducted a study assessing what percentage of people who have contracted SARS-CoV-2 are likely to experience any symptoms. This preliminary study does not yet appear in a peer-reviewed journal, but its authors have made their findings available online, on the preprint platform arXiv.

      The rate of likely asymptomatic carriers of the coronavirus could have important implications for viral transmission, the study authors point out. “This work allows us to clearly show the difficulties in identifying infections with surveillance since the majority of these are not associated with respiratory symptoms or fever,” says study co-author Stefano ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    6. Tulsa Health Official Says Trump's Rally Likely Contributed to Surge

      Tulsa Health Official Says Trump's Rally Likely Contributed to Surge

      President Donald Trump's campaign rally in late June, as well as the accompanying counterprotests, likely contributed to the area's recent spike in coronavirus cases, Tulsa City-County Health Department Director Dr. Bruce Dart said Wednesday.

      "In the past few days, we've seen almost 500 new cases, and we had several large events just over two weeks ago, so I guess we just connect the dots," Dart said at a press conference.

      Dart, who said prior to the rally he'd recommended it be postponed over health concerns, added on Wednesday that "significant events in the past few weeks" had "more than likely contributed" to Tulsa County's surge in cases.

      Tulsa County reported 261 new cases on Tuesday ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    7. Supreme Court Blocks Access to Trump's Financial Records, For Now

      Supreme Court Blocks Access to Trump's Financial Records, For Now

      The Supreme Court on Thursday blocked House Democrats from accessing President Donald Trump's financial records, but ruled that the President is not immune from a subpoena for his financial documents from a New York prosecutor.

      The cases were sent back to lower courts for further review, all but ensuring that Trump's financial documents, which he has long sought to protect, will not be handed over before the November presidential election.
      Chief Justice John Roberts penned the 7-2 opinion in the New York prosecutor case, and was joined by Trump's two nominees, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito filed dissenting opinions.

      "(W)e cannot conclude that absolute immunity is necessary or appropriate ...

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      Mentions: featured
    8. Pelosi Rejects Trump Admin's $1 Trillion Limitation for Coronavirus Relief

      Pelosi Rejects Trump Admin's $1 Trillion Limitation for Coronavirus Relief

      Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday rejected the Trump administration’s calls to limit the next coronavirus relief package to $1 trillion, arguing that Congress will need to approve at least double that amount amid a surge in cases. "A trillion dollars is OK, that’s an interesting starting point. But that doesn’t come anywhere near," Pelosi said at her news conference.

      Congressional leaders, including Pelosi, are in the early stages of drafting a fifth mammoth aid bill to stave off a total collapse of the U.S. economy while infusing cash in health efforts to control the coronavirus pandemic. But Democratic and Republican leaders remain fiercely at odds over the size and scope of the package, raising questions about ...

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    9. Supreme Court Ruling Hands Oklahoma Indian Reservation A Huge Win

      Supreme Court Ruling Hands Oklahoma Indian Reservation A Huge Win

      The Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that a large swath of Oklahoma belongs to Native American tribes in a huge win for a reservation that challenged the state's authority to prosecute crimes on its land.

      In the 5-4 decision, the majority ruled that the disputed area covering roughly half of the state and most of the city of Tulsa belongs to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

      "Today we are asked whether the land these treaties promised remains an Indian reservation for purposes of federal criminal law," Justice Neil Gorsuch, a Trump appointee, wrote for the majority. "Because Congress has not said otherwise, we hold the government to its word."

      The ruling could upend the state's authority over much of ...

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    10. $192M Shareholder Settlement Reached Over Failed NC Nuclear Project

      $192M Shareholder Settlement Reached Over Failed NC Nuclear Project

      A federal judge signed off on a $192.5 million legal settlement Thursday between the former shareholders of SCANA Corp. and the company’s new owner Dominion Energy.

      The deal, which is being celebrated as the largest investor-related settlement in South Carolina history, stems from the failed V.C. Summer nuclear expansion project in Fairfield County. 

      That project, which lasted for nearly a decade, was undertaken by Cayce-based SCANA and Santee Cooper, South Carolina’s state-run utility. 

      The payout to SCANA’s investors is the latest settlement to come out of the failed nuclear project in which $9 billion was sunk into two unfinished reactors before construction was halted.

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    11. Oklahoma City Hospital Reaches $72.3M Settlement Over Alleged Kickback Scheme

      Oklahoma City Hospital Reaches $72.3M Settlement Over Alleged Kickback Scheme

      An Oklahoma City hospital, physician group and management company have reached a $72.3 million settlement over allegations of a kickback scheme brought forth by a whistleblower.

      Oklahoma Center for Orthopaedic and Multi-Specialty Surgery, and its part-owner and management company, USP OKC Inc. and USP OKC Manager Inc., along with Southwest Orthopaedic Specialists and two of their physicians, will pay the massive settlement to resolve allegations under the False Claims Act and the Oklahoma Medicaid False Claims Act.

      The settlement is over allegations of improper relationships between the hospital and physicians that led to the submission of false claims to the Medicare, Medicaid and TRICARE programs, the U.S. Justice Department announced Wednesday.

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    12. Lawsuit Alleges Wendy's Franchisee Spent $1M PPP Funding Building Home

      Lawsuit Alleges Wendy's Franchisee Spent $1M PPP Funding Building Home

      Sandi Adler, a former employee of Starboard Group, which happens to be a large Wendy’s operator, has spilled all the tea regarding the franchisee’s chief executive, who she claims diverted $1 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans to foot the bill for his mansion in Montana.

      Adler, who served as Starboard’s vice president of legal affairs and human resources before being fired on June 1st for complaining about the bogus practices, filed the complaint on June 30th in Broward County under Florida’s whistleblower statute. In her complaint, she alleges that Starboard was granted about $9 million in PPP loans to be used for operations of their 101 Wendy’s locations across seven states. They also oversee ...

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      Mentions: Florida
    13. Mother Sues Ex-Employer After Fired Over Kids Disrupting At-Home Meeting

      Mother Sues Ex-Employer After Fired Over Kids Disrupting At-Home Meeting

      “Her childcare options evaporated overnight.” It happened to thousands of families when the state of California forced everyone to stay home as the coronavirus crept into town.

      It happened to Drisana Rios. The mother of two was an account executive with insurance firm HUB International in San Diego. In March, she was sent home to work alongside a needy 1-year-old and 4-year-old. “It was a little crazy and wild for all of us,” said Daphne Delvaux.

      Delvaux is an employment attorney with the Gruenberg Law firm. She filed a lawsuit on behalf of Rios who was recently terminated by HUB International. According to the lawsuit, Rios said she was admonished for her children being too loud during conference calls. “As ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    14. "Church" Faces Criminal Charges After Selling Bleach as COVID-19 Cure

      "Church" Faces Criminal Charges After Selling Bleach as COVID-19 Cure

      The Feds have had enough of a Florida “church” selling bleach as a COVID-19 cure. On Wednesday, criminal charges were unsealed against the leadership of “Genesis II Church of Health and Healing,” allegedly a family business of sorts that, according to authorities, sold a half-million dollars in “Miracle Mineral Solution” (MMS) products to their devoted followers over the past year.

      The church’s “archbishop,” Mark Scott Grenon, is a household name in the household-cleaners-as-fake-medicines game. In 2016, ABC News covered his venture in a story on “the high priests of snake oil.”

      Grenon and his adult sons Jonathan, Jordan and Joseph now face criminal charges: Conspiracy to defraud the United States and criminal contempt — the latter for allegedly “willfully violating ...

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      Mentions: Florida Coronavirus
    15. Retired Major General Pleads Guilty to Sexually Abusing Daughter

      Retired Major General Pleads Guilty to Sexually Abusing Daughter

      James Grazioplene, a retired Major General in the United States, has admitted to sexually abusing his daughter in the 1980s. The victim, Jennifer Elmore, turned 49 on Wednesday, the same day Grazioplene pleaded guilty to aggravated sexual battery in a Prince William County, Virginia.

      The former officer has been in jail for approximately 18 months. He is expected to be released and will serve 20 years of probation, according to Elmore’s lawyer, Ryan Guilds.

      The counsel told CNN that “Jennifer cares more about the truth than the punishment”.

      In 2015, Elmore first reported to Army authorities that her father repeatedly molested and raped her throughout her childhood. The military launched an investigation in 2017. But two weeks before the ...

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    16. Lady A, Formerly Lady Antebellum, Sues Singer Using Same Name

      Lady A, Formerly Lady Antebellum, Sues Singer Using Same Name

      Country group Lady A, which changed its name from Lady Antebellum last month in an effort to distance themselves from associations with slavery and the Civil War, filed a trademark lawsuit on Wednesday against blues singer Anita White, who also goes by the name Lady A.

      The band Lady A originally intended to work out a solution with White that would allow both to perform under the name Lady A—but in a statement, the band says they “reluctantly” decided to sue after White asked for $10 million and negotiations broke down, according to Billboard.

      According to the lawsuit, the band has held the trademark for “Lady A” since 2011, though White had been performing under the moniker for years ...

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    17. Delaware State University Announces Acquisition of Wesley College

      Delaware State University Announces Acquisition of Wesley College

      Delaware State University and Wesley College have announced a merger agreement, subject to a number of conditions. The two Dover institutions had earlier confirmed that talks were taking place. The Definitive Agreement calls for Delaware State University’s acquisition of Wesley College no later than June 30, 2021.

      Prior to the actual acquisition, both institutions will look for ways to cut costs. DSU will also seek financial assistance to complete the acquisition to avoid weakening its financial condition.

      “Despite so much uncertainty on many fronts nationally, this is a unique opportunity for the University and the State of Delaware. The time for bold innovation for young people is now, particularly for students who have made it to college by sheer ...

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    18. Florida Emerges As Global COVID-19 Epicenter

      Florida Emerges As Global COVID-19 Epicenter

      Florida has emerged as a global epicenter of the latest coronavirus surge, raising questions about the safety of major events that relocated to the state. As coronavirus cases surged throughout much of the Northeast in April and May, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) declared victory.

      Florida was one of the last states to impose a stay-at-home order, and one of the first to reopen. DeSantis earned praise from President Trump for his response to the pandemic and attacked the media for fearmongering after the state reopened its beaches. “When you look at some of the most draconian orders that have been issued in some of these states and compare Florida in terms of our hospitalizations ... I mean, you go from ...

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    19. Toxic Hand Sanitizers Containing Methanol Recalled

      Toxic Hand Sanitizers Containing Methanol Recalled

      Two brands of hand sanitizer are being recalled by their manufacturers due to methanol, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The recalls come after the agency warned consumers against buying more than a dozen brands of hand sanitizer that tested positive for the toxic substance, including the two under recall.

      ITECH 361 is recalling almost 19,000 bottles of All Clean Hand Sanitizer, Moisturizer and Disinfectant, with UPC Code 628055370130 and sold in one liter bottles, because of the potential presence of methanol. The product was sold nationally to both wholesale distributors and to retailers.

      The second recall is from Transliquid Technologies LLC, which is recalling all Mystic Shield Protection Topical Solution packaged in 8.45 ounce (250 ml ...

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    20. WHO Confirms 'Emerging Evidence' of COVID-19 Airborne Transmission

      WHO Confirms 'Emerging Evidence' of COVID-19 Airborne Transmission

      The World Health Organization confirmed there is "emerging evidence" of airborne transmission of the coronavirus following the publication of a letter Monday signed by 239 scientists that urged the agency to be more forthcoming about the likelihood that people can catch the virus from droplets floating in the air.

      Dr. Benedetta Alleganzi, WHO Technical Lead for Infection Prevention and Control, said during a briefing Tuesday, that the agency has discussed and collaborated with many of the scientists who signed the letter. "We acknowledge that there is emerging evidence in this field, as in all other fields regarding the Covid-19 virus and pandemic and therefore we believe that we have to be open to this evidence and understand its implications regarding ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    21. Scientists Warn of Potential Coronavirus-Related Brain Damage

      Scientists Warn of Potential Coronavirus-Related Brain Damage

      Scientists warned on Wednesday of a potential wave of coronavirus-related brain damage as new evidence suggested COVID-19 can lead to severe neurological complications, including inflammation, psychosis and delirium. A study by researchers at University College London (UCL)described 43 cases of patients with COVID-19 who suffered either temporary brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage or other serious brain effects.

      The research adds to recent studies which also found the disease can damage the brain. "Whether we will see an epidemic on a large scale of brain damage linked to the pandemic – perhaps similar to the encephalitis lethargica outbreak in the 1920s and 1930s after the 1918 influenza pandemic – remains to be seen," said Michael Zandi, from UCL's Institute of Neurology ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    22. Supreme Court Upholds Trump Admin's Birth Control Coverage Limitations

      Supreme Court Upholds Trump Admin's Birth Control Coverage Limitations

      The Supreme Court on Wednesday upheld the Trump administration’s broad rollback of Obamacare rules requiring employers to provide free birth control to women, in a major victory for religious groups allied with President Donald Trump.

      The Supreme Court, in its 7-2 ruling, sought to resolve a long-running legal battle that previously vexed the justices — how to strike the right balance between ensuring access to birth control and safeguarding religious freedom protections. But the court's decision appears likely to revive debate over the culture war issue as the presidential election kicks into gear.

      The decision allows the Trump administration to move forward with rules that would allow virtually any employer to claim a religious or moral exemption to providing ...

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      Mentions: featured
    23. $700 Billion-Plus 'Buy American' Campaign Proposed by Biden

      $700 Billion-Plus 'Buy American' Campaign Proposed by Biden

      Launching an economic pitch expected to anchor his fall presidential campaign, Democratic candidate Joe Biden is proposing sweeping new uses of the federal government’s regulatory and spending power to bolster U.S. manufacturing and technology firms.

      Biden calls for a $400 billion, four-year increase in government purchasing of U.S.-based goods and services plus $300 billion in new research and development in U.S. technology concerns. Among other policies expected to be announced Thursday, he proposes tightening current “Buy American” laws that are intended to benefit U.S. firms but can be easily circumvented by government agencies.

      An outline released by Biden’s campaign also touts his long-standing promises to strengthen workers’ collective bargaining rights and repeal Republican-backed ...

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    24. Kanye West No Longer Supports Trump, Plans to Run Himself

      Kanye West No Longer Supports Trump, Plans to Run Himself

      Kanye West continues to deliver sensational details about his 2020 presidential run, despite an apparent lack of an actual campaign. The rapper, 43, said in a "rambling" interview Tuesday with Forbes that he contracted the coronavirus in February, no longer supports President Donald Trump and plans to run as a member of the "Birthday Party." 

      “Because when we win, it’s everybody’s birthday," West explained to the outlet.

      In a sudden 180-degree shift after showing public support for the president, West said he has lost confidence in Trump's leadership. "I am taking the red hat off," he said. "It looks like one big mess to me. I don’t like that I caught wind that he hid in ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
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