1. Articles in category: Opioids

    73-96 of 281 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 10 11 12 »
    1. The changing face of the US opioid epidemic: Middle-aged black adults see rise in deaths

      The changing face of the US opioid epidemic: Middle-aged black adults see rise in deaths

      In large metropolitan areas, black adults saw the largest increases in rates of drug overdose deaths involving opioids and synthetic opioids, with rates increasing 103% and 361% respectively, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      From 2015 to 2017, nearly all racial and ethnic groups and all age groups experienced significant increases in opioid-involved and synthetic opioid-involved overdose death rates.
      Earlier research has found that synthetic opioids accounted for nearly 60% of opioid-involved overdose deaths in the United States in 2017. There has also been an increase in deaths involving cocaine and psychostimulants such as methamphetamine, MDMA and methylphenidate (commonly sold as Ritalin).
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    2. Newborn Opioid Withdrawal Lawsuits On the Rise

      Newborn Opioid Withdrawal Lawsuits On the Rise

      You’re probably aware that several states have taken action against big pharma for its role in the opioid crisis. Opioids are killing American teens and adults at an alarming rate. Numerous states, cities and counties have sued or are in the midst of pursuing multi-million dollar lawsuits against the drug makers that manufactured and marketed billions of highly addictive pain relieving pills without informing patients or doctors of the risks.

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    3. Global negotiation deadline set for November 22

      Global negotiation deadline set for November 22

      Federal Judge Dan Polster, who presides over the opioid multidistrict litigation, approved a nationwide negotiation class on September 11th that would cover more than 30,000 governmental entities. 

      Polster expressed great interest in settling these claims with a global negotiation, and set a deadline of November 22nd for members to opt in or out of the settlement class. 

      Appeals to stop the negotiation class are currently pending before the Sixth Circuit. 

      The rush to settle is in part due to efforts to avoid impending bellwether trials as well as circumvent the negotiation class.

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    4. Two WV cases head for opioid MDL bellwether trial

      Two WV cases head for opioid MDL bellwether trial

      There are two West Virginia cases headed for the next bellwether track in the MDL.  The second bellwether track involves the city of Huntington, West Virginia and Cabell County Commission. 

      This second track comes after two Ohio counties settled with opioid drugmakers and the first track's MDL trial was cancelled.

      Although the trial is not yet scheduled, attorneys from both sides are gearing up for closed-door debates over the next week, looking at the settlements that have occurred.

      Their full case names are:

      (1) The City of Huntington v. AmerisourceBergen Drug Corp. et al., case number 3:17-cv-01362,

      (2) Cabell County Commission v. AmerisourceBergen Corp. et al., case number 3:17-cv-01665 and

       

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    5. Opioids: An Equal Opportunity Killer

      Opioids: An Equal Opportunity Killer

      The crisis brings misery to all people of all races. 

      Although guns, immigration and impeachment divide America, one issue that unites us is resolving the opioid crisis. 

      The opioid epidemic kills an average of 130 Americans a day and it does not discriminate. 

      The scale of death is larger than any epidemic in history and has created a controversy that leaves almost no one unaffected.

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    6. The White House claims opioid crisis cost $2.5 trillion over 4 years.

      The White House claims opioid crisis cost $2.5 trillion over 4 years.

      The Council for Economic Advisors (CEA), has estimated the cost of the opioid crisis as $696 billion in 2018, and $2.5 trillion from 2015-2018. 

      This nationwide economic destruction is still at large, and the opioid epidemic contributes to this number more everyday.

      The number was arrived at by combining factors such as lost lives, increases in healthcare, substance abuse treatment costs, increases in criminal justice and reductions in productivity.

      The CEA accounted for the value of statistical life (VSL) in their report.

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    7. Rutgers doctors and lawyers claim there will 'never be enough' money to manage opioid crisis

      Rutgers doctors and lawyers claim there will 'never be enough' money to manage opioid crisis

      Lawyers and doctors following the opioid lawsuit claim the settlement money falls too far short of resolving the epidemic. 

      Rutgers doctor, Lewis Nelson, MD claims there will never be enough money to manage the opioid crisis, but the opioid drugmakers taking accountability is a start. 

      While settlement could be good for everyone, the devil is in the details.

      Jennifer Olivia, JD claims that trial rather than settlement could be better for doctors due to the mass amounts of information that would be disclosed about the opioid drugmakers, taking blame away from physicians. 

       

       

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    8. Why Hospitals Are Suing Opioid Drugmakers

      Why Hospitals Are Suing Opioid Drugmakers

      While the media has highlighted the MDL bellwether cases involving cities, counties and Native American tribes, another group of plaintiffs has been given their own bellwether case: hospitals. 

      Hundreds of hospitals have sued opioid drugmakers in federal court due to the economic impact they have faced from the opioid epidemic. 

      The hospitals explain the expenses of treating overdose and opioid-addicted patients without insurance has skyrocketed in the past decade. 

      The costs of these overdoses has cost hospitals billions of dollars every year. 

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    9. Opioid MDL Attorney Explains Doubts About Global Settlement

      Opioid MDL Attorney Explains Doubts About Global Settlement

      While two Ohio counties settled this past Monday, more than 2,000 states, counties, cities and tribes are working towards a global settlement with opioid defendants. 

      The global settlement has not yet happened due to disagreements between the plaintiffs over how the settlement money will be distributed. 

      Paul Farrell, who represents around 700 cities and towns claims those communities are not interested in a global settlement like we have seen before in the tobacco trials of the 90's. 

      Farrell explained the cities want a community solution to a community problem and don't want the money to be spent by the legislature or sent to the general treasury like the tobacco settlement money.

      Farrell also explained an issue was ...

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    10. Teva offers colossal $23.3B opioid deal to escape lawsuits

      Teva offers colossal $23.3B opioid deal to escape lawsuits

      Instead of facing the courtroom in an Ohio bellwether opioid trial, Teva is opting to bow out with a $45 million settlement with two counties. But that's just one piece of a much bigger deal in the works.

      Teva is seeking to opt out of all its opioid suits to the tune of $250 million in cash and $23 billion in free drugs.

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      Mentions: Tribal Track
    11. Opioid Crisis Forcing Kids into Foster Care

      Opioid Crisis Forcing Kids into Foster Care

      The opioid crisis is putting a tremendous amount of pressure on the foster care system. 

      After the $260 million settlement in Ohio, many states are considering the potential of using their own settlement money toward the entities in their state affected most by the crisis. 

      Foster programs have taken a hard impact economically, and are likely to gain support financially from settlement funds.

      The children in these homes are often thankful for the opportunity to get out of drug/opioid-ridden homes so they do not end up in the same situation their parents are in.

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    12. Teva Pharmaceutical's Stock Surges Post $23 Billion Global Opioid Settlement

      Teva Pharmaceutical's Stock Surges  Post $23 Billion Global Opioid Settlement

      Teva's stock surged Monday after proclaiming their $23 billion global settlement meant to resolve all allegations against the company for its role in fueling the opioid epidemic. 

      The stock rose more than 8%.

      Per the settlement deal, Teva would donate the $23 billion in opioid addiction treatment drugs and pay $250 million over 10 years. 

      This agreement in principle is with a group of attorneys general from multiple states as well as other defendants.

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    13. $260 Million opioid settlement in Ohio could open door for much larger deal

      $260 Million opioid settlement in Ohio could open door for much larger deal

      Two Ohio counties and four drug companies settled a landmark lawsuit over responsibility for the opioid epidemic Monday in a deal that could help push the parties toward a wide-ranging agreement on more than 2,400 similar claims filed across the country.

      The $260 million settlement, reached just hours before opening arguments were scheduled to begin in the first federal lawsuit of the opioid era, will give Cuyahoga and Summit counties badly needed cash and anti-addiction medication. Those will be provided by mammoth opioid distributors McKesson Corp., AmerisourceBergen and Cardinal Health, and drug manufacturer Teva Pharmaceuticals, four of the defendants in the first case.

      But the agreement also may help guide the next round of negotiating as drug companies and ...

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    14. MDL Bellwether Trial Delayed After Huge Settlement

      MDL Bellwether Trial Delayed After Huge Settlement

      The Plaintiff's Executive Committee in the National Prescription Opiate Litigation (NPOL) has issued a statement that the bellwether trial scheduled for today, Monday October 21st will not begin as scheduled after a last minute proposed settlement from four defendants. 

      They claim the opioid MDL will move forward to determine the claims of over 2,000 plaintiffs that represent American communities' claims against opioid industry defendants.

      Details of the settlement deal have not been disclosed, but there are discussions that the two Ohio counties, Summit and Cuyahoga will receive roughly $235 million in cash, along with donations of medicine to treat patients suffering from opioid addiction.

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    15. Four Drug Companies Reach Settlement Hours Before Opioid MDL

      Four Drug Companies Reach Settlement Hours Before Opioid MDL

      McKesson Corp., Cardinal Health, Inc., AmerisourceBergen Corp. and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. have settled  just hours before they were due in court for the opioid multidistrict litigation. 

      These four defendants reached a settlement in the landmark trial in Cleveland, Ohio that was meant to be a "bellwether trial" to determine how the other 2,600 cases would play out from negotiations to trial. 

      It is unclear whether this deal was for the proposed global negotiation or just for the bellwether trial against two Ohio counties. 

      Walgreens, another defendant, has not yet settled so it is unclear whether the trial will go forward. 

       

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    16. $260M Settlement Averts First Federal Opioid Trial

      $260M Settlement Averts First Federal Opioid Trial

      Two Ohio counties and four drug companies agreed to a $260 million settlement, averting the first federal opioid trial an hour before opening arguments were scheduled to begin Monday.

      • The deal is between distributors McKesson, AmeriSourceBergen and Cardinal Health, along with Teva Pharmaceuticals, an Israeli manufacturer, and Ohio’s Summit and Cuyahoga counties.
      • The counties will receive $235 million in cash from the four companies and $25 million in anti-addiction medication from Teva.
      • Walgreens was not included, and the New York Times reported it will be going forward with its case.
      • The deal comes as talks for a $50 billion settlement collapsed over the weekend.
      • The drug companies are still contending with over 2,400 claims from across the country ...
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    17. State AG's propose $48 Billion Global Settlement

      State AG's propose $48 Billion Global Settlement

      Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro announced on Monday a proposal to settle thousands of opioid lawsuits across the country for $48 billion in cash and treatment medication from major pharmaceutical companies.

      The proposal on the table is meant to resolve litigation in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The group of four state attorneys general leading the settlement talks said they are now working to get other states and local governments on board, in an attempt to resolve the massive litigation stemming from an opioid crisis that has led to more than 400,000 deaths and left cities and countries struggling with the costs of addiction in their communities.

      But one of the lead attorneys for cases brought ...

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    18. Drug distributors in talks to settle opioid litigation for $18B

      Drug distributors in talks to settle opioid litigation for $18B

      State and local officials are reportedly in talks with three major drug distributors on a potential $18 billion settlement of litigation that blames them for helping to fuel the U.S. opioid epidemic.

      The potential settlement would require McKesson, AmerisourceBergen and Cardinal Health to collectively pay the $18 billion over 18 years. Drugmaker Johnson & Johnson is also involved in the discussions to pay extra money.

      States, local governments and Native American tribes have filed some 2,000 opioid lawsuits against the distributors, drugmakers and other companies public officials say contributed to the opioid crisis. The three drug distributors were slated to go to trial Monday in U.S. District Court in Cleveland in what were seen as test cases for ...

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    19. The Faces of the Opioid Crisis

      The Faces of the Opioid Crisis

      As the opioid multi-district litigation draws nearer, Americans not affected are few and far between. 

      The victims of the opioid epidemic are from Arizona to Maine, in all walks of life. 

      Costing the economy billions, and claiming more lives than the Vietnam war, the carnage left behind from the epidemic is unmatched. 

      Pictures of victims represent a snapshot of the country but claimed lives were more than just a body count. 

      They were college students, aspiring musicians, athletes, chefs, a race car driver, a high school student, an auto mechanic, a bank employee, and the son of a former US congressman.

      Americans, and plaintiffs in the upcoming litigation hope that the case will shed light on the epidemic, give victim ...

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    20. A Guide to the "Largest Civil Trial in U.S. History"

      A Guide to the "Largest Civil Trial in U.S. History"

      The landmark opioid litigation that launches in less than a week has broken records with more plaintiffs and defendants than any case before it, encompassing the entire United States. 

      With more than 2,600 plaintiffs in the multi-district opioid litigation, the federal court created a bellwether track to inspire urgency of the parties to act. The bellwether is also meant for plaintiffs and defendants to see if the parties settle, and if so how much money is at stake for negotiation purposes.

      While Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt, Endo and Allergen have all tentatively agreed to settle with the plaintiffs in the bellwether case, and Purdue is in bankruptcy court, the trial has consequently become a case against distributors. 

      Distributors include Teva ...

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    21. Meet the Hometown Lawyer Avenging WV in the Opioid Litigation

      Meet the Hometown Lawyer Avenging WV in the Opioid Litigation

      Paul Farrell was an attorney in West Virginia, when suddenly his home became the epicenter of the opioid epidemic.

      Farrell is now leading the show and avenging his state as one of the three lead attorneys in the opioid multidistrict litigation case. 

      The first courtroom showdown for the national opioid litigation trials begins next Monday on October 21st.

      Farrell claimed he is tired of going to funerals, and seeing his family and friends die from the opioid epidemic.

      He represents not only West Virginia but thousands of municipalities affected by the epidemic. 

       

      Picture: Herald-Dispatch 

       

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