1. Articles in category: Political and Legislative

    1705-1728 of 1806 « 1 2 ... 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 »
    1. First black woman to become mayor of San Francisco

      First black woman to become mayor of San Francisco

      SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - London Breed will make history Wednesday as the first black female mayor of San Francisco when she is sworn into office in the city that has come to embody extreme wealth and poverty in the modern age.

      She will take the oath outdoors on the steps of City Hall in a public ceremony before at least 1,000 spectators. Afterward, she will meet well-wishers in her new office - an open house tradition that dates back a century.

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    2. Labor Dept. Still Doubling Down on Most Wage Settlements

      Labor Dept. Still Doubling Down on Most Wage Settlements

      An Obama-era wage enforcement policy to charge businesses double the back pay owed to workers has so far survived the Trump administration’s business-friendly makeover.

      The Labor Department’s philosophy has shifted under Secretary Alexander Acosta to emphasize teaching employers to comply with minimum wage and overtime laws rather than relying on punitive enforcement.

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    3. Trump administration takes another swipe at ‘Obamacare’

      Trump administration takes another swipe at ‘Obamacare’

      WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is freezing payments under an “Obamacare” program that protects insurers with sicker patients from financial losses, a move expected to add to premium increases next year.

      At stake are billions in payments to insurers with sicker customers. The latest administration action could disrupt the Affordable Care Act, the health care law that has withstood President Donald Trump’s efforts to completely repeal it.

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    4. New rates for counsel representing indigent defendants and families

      New rates for counsel representing indigent defendants and families

      For the first time in over 20 years, the Tennessee Supreme Court has ordered an increase in the amount paid to lawyers representing indigent parties in criminal and child welfare cases. This rate increase, a 25 percent hike in the hourly rate paid to lawyers for out-of-court work, was funded by a $9.7 million appropriation by the General Assembly and signed by Governor Bill Haslam.

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    5. What’s driving the movement to Abolish ICE?

      What’s driving the movement to Abolish ICE?

      In the past week, Immigration and Customs Enforcement has become the target of a growing number of Democrats in Congress who are unhappy with the Trump administration’s immigration priorities — especially its separation of families at the border.

      Progressive activists have been calling to abolish ICE for months, and this week, one protester was arrested after climbing the base of the Statue of Liberty on the Fourth of July. These activists have recently been joined by Democratic Sens.

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    6. Loophole allows shelters for migrant kids to escape inspections

      Loophole allows shelters for migrant kids to escape inspections

      A loophole in federal policy allows the "Tent City" at the Tornillo Port of Entry in Texas and a massive shelter in Homestead, Florida to escape the rigorous, often unannounced child welfare inspections that nearly all other similar shelters are subjected to.

      The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) operates more than 100 shelters for unaccompanied migrant children across 17 states.

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    7. Trump administration says it will start reuniting families separated at the border

      Trump administration says it will start reuniting families separated at the border

      WASHINGTON (AP) — Stung by a public outcry, the Trump administration said Thursday it will meet court-ordered deadlines for reuniting families separated at the border, even as the politics of immigration remained at a boil.

      Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told reporters that his department is ready to reunite children in its care with their parents, starting next Tuesday with those under age 5.

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    8. California judiciary has paid nearly $645K in six years for gender-based misconduct claims

      California judiciary has paid nearly $645K in six years for gender-based misconduct claims

      Since 2012, the California judiciary has paid settlements totaling almost $645,000 to people accusing judicial officers of sexual harassment or gender discrimination, the Recorder reported last week. That information comes from 64 pages of settlement agreements provided by the state’s judicial branch after a public records request by the Recorder. Those records are heavily redacted; none identifies the accuser and only a few identify the accused. Specifics were also removed.

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    9. US to stop encouraging race as factor in school admissions

      US to stop encouraging race as factor in school admissions

      WASHINGTON (AP) - The Trump administration on Tuesday rescinded Obama-era guidance that encouraged schools to take a student's race into account to promote diversity in admissions.

      The shift suggests schools will have the federal government's blessing to leave race out of admissions and enrollment decisions, and it underscores the contentious politics that continue to surround affirmative action policies, which have repeatedly been challenged before the Supreme Court.

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    10. MN Attorney General sues opioid maker Purdue Pharma

      Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson has filed a lawsuit against opioid manufacturer Purdue Pharma, accusing it of violating consumer fraud laws in marketing the painkilling drug OxyContin. Purdue Pharma allegedly used sales representatives, payments to promoters, and third-party front groups to “spread its deceptive messages about opioids,” Swanson said Monday in announcing the Hennepin County District Court lawsuit. Minnesota is the 26th state to sue Purdue Pharma this year.

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    11. Michigan judge rules kids don't have a fundamental right to literacy

      Michigan judge rules kids don't have a fundamental right to literacy

      A Michigan judge ruled last week that children do not have a fundamental right to learn how to read and write.

      The ruling came in response to a lawsuit filed by Public Counsel, the nation’s largest public interest law firm, on behalf of Detroit students that sought to hold state authorities, including Gov. Rick Snyder (R), accountable for what plaintiffs alleged were systemic failures depriving children of their right to literacy,

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    1705-1728 of 1806 « 1 2 ... 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 »
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