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    1. Nike and Michael Jordan Sued for Allegedly Copying Logo

      Nike and Michael Jordan Sued for Allegedly Copying Logo

      An independent New York-based fashion brand is suing Nike and Michael Jordan for a whopping $30 million for allegedly hijacking its unique star-shaped logo and using it in a Jordan brand collaboration collection tied to the 2020 NBA All-Star Game. According to the complaint that it filed in a New York federal court on Monday, Faded Royalty claims that Nike, Michael Jordan, himself, and artist Cody Hudson, among others, are on the hook for copyright and trademark infringement for “intentionally and willfully creating apparel and other promotional goods using [its] ‘6 point’ star logo.”

      In the newly-filed complaint, Faded Royalty and its founder Rocco Giordano claim that “beginning in the year 2000, [they] created and began using their ‘6 point ...

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    2. Supreme Court Sides With Booking.com in Trademark Fight

      Supreme Court Sides With Booking.com in Trademark Fight

      “A generic name – the name of a class of products or services – is ineligible for federal trademark registration,” the Supreme Court held on Tuesday in its decision in the closely-watched booking.com case. However, while the nation’s highest court determined that such generic marks may not be registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”), adding a Generic top-level domain, such as “.com” to such a generic term is capable of changing the outcome, which is why “‘Booking.com’ – unlike the term ‘booking’ standing alone – is not generic” in the eyes of the court.

      In its decision, which was authored by Justice Ginsburg, the court held that “a term styled ‘generic.com’ is a generic name for ...

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    3. Nike Defeats Adidas in Long Running Patent Battle

      Nike Defeats Adidas in Long Running Patent Battle

      Nike has come out on top in the latest leg of a long-running web of legal battles with adidas over their respective knitted footwear. After beating out the German sportswear giant before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”) in connection with its quest to invalidate a number of claims in two patents for Nike’s heavily-protected Flyknit technology, Nike has been handed a victory from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. 

      A 3-judge panel for the Federal Circuit determined that while adidas does, in fact, have standing to appeal the PTAB’s earlier inter partes review (“IPR”) decision, in which it held that adidas “had not demonstrated that the challenged claims [in Nike’s patents ...

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    4. Puma to Block Nike From Gaining Generic 'Footware' Trademark

      Puma to Block Nike From Gaining Generic 'Footware' Trademark

      Puma is not easing up on its quest to block Nike from gaining a trademark registration for the word “footware” for use on seemingly sneaker-specific software products and services. On the heels of waging an early-stage challenge to the trademark application that Nike filed in March 2019, which saw Puma send a “letter of protest” to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”), arguing that that “footware” is a “descriptive” term, and thus, not eligible for registration, the German multinational footwear brand has initiated opposition proceedings in connection with Nike’s application, asserting that Nike’s potential registration should be blocked. 

      In its June 16 opposition filing, as first reported by Law360, Puma argues – again – that “footware” is a ...

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    5. TikTok Allegedly Failed to Secure Adequate Licenses and Could Face Copyright Lawsuit

      TikTok Allegedly Failed to Secure Adequate Licenses and Could Face Copyright Lawsuit

      At the heart of the majority of short videos posted to TikTok is music – whether it be dances choreographed to Megan Thee Stallion’s 2020 hit “Savage” or the Ilkan Gunuc Remix of Lalala, which coincides with a specific breed of emoji challenge videos. The problem, according to at least one major music trade body? TikTok and its parent company, Beijing-based Bytedance, has allegedly failed to secure adequate licenses for the songs being used in videos by its 800 million users worldwide. 

      With that in mind, and given that an estimated 50 percent of the music featured in TikTok videos is unlicensed, David Israelite, chief executive of the National Music Publishers Association (“NMPA”), told the Financial Times in April that ...

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