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    1. Mexican President Volunteers to Take Russia's Coronavirus Vaccine

      Mexican President Volunteers to Take Russia's Coronavirus Vaccine

      (Reuters) - Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Monday he would volunteer to be among the first to try a Russian vaccine for the novel coronavirus if it proved effective.

      Moscow's decision to approve the vaccine and produce here the first batches after less than two months of human testing has raised concerns among some scientists considering only about 10% of clinical trials are successful.

      Some scientists have said they fear Russia may be putting prestige before safety.

      "I'd be the first to be vaccinated," Lopez Obrador said at his regular morning news conference.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    2. Scientists Warn of Potential Coronavirus-Related Brain Damage

      Scientists Warn of Potential Coronavirus-Related Brain Damage

      Scientists warned on Wednesday of a potential wave of coronavirus-related brain damage as new evidence suggested COVID-19 can lead to severe neurological complications, including inflammation, psychosis and delirium. A study by researchers at University College London (UCL)described 43 cases of patients with COVID-19 who suffered either temporary brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage or other serious brain effects.

      The research adds to recent studies which also found the disease can damage the brain. "Whether we will see an epidemic on a large scale of brain damage linked to the pandemic – perhaps similar to the encephalitis lethargica outbreak in the 1920s and 1930s after the 1918 influenza pandemic – remains to be seen," said Michael Zandi, from UCL's Institute of Neurology ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    3. Hundreds of Scientists Claim Evidence Shows COVID-19 is Airborne

      Hundreds of Scientists Claim Evidence Shows COVID-19 is Airborne

      Hundreds of scientists say there is evidence that the novel coronavirus in smaller particles in the air can infect people and are calling for the World Health Organization to revise recommendations, the New York Times reported on Saturday.

      The WHO has said the coronavirus disease spreads primarily from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth, which are expelled when a person with COVID-19 coughs, sneezes or speaks.

      In an open letter to the agency, which the researchers plan to publish in a scientific journal next week, 239 scientists in 32 countries outlined the evidence showing smaller particles can infect people, the NYT said nyti.ms/2VIxp67.

      "We are aware of the article and are reviewing its ...

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    4. Florida Reports Daily Record of 10,000 Cases

      Florida Reports Daily Record of 10,000 Cases

      Florida shattered records on Thursday when it reported over 10,000 new coronavirus cases, the biggest one-day increase in the state since the pandemic started, according to a Reuters tally.

      Outbreaks in Texas, California, Florida and Arizona have helped the United States break records and send cases rising at rates not seen since April.

      In June, Florida infections rose by 168% or over 95,000 new cases. The percent of tests coming back positive has skyrocketed to 15% from 4% at the end of May.

      Florida, with 21 million residents, has reported more new daily coronavirus cases than any European country had at the height of their outbreaks.

       

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      Mentions: Florida Coronavirus
    5. More Direct Payments in Next Coronavirus Aid Bill Seriously Considered

      More Direct Payments in Next Coronavirus Aid Bill Seriously Considered

      U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Wednesday he would seriously consider more direct payments to individuals in the next phase of coronavirus rescue legislation, adding that funds should also be targeted to help sectors struggling to reopen, including hospitality and tourism.

      Testifying before the U.S. Senate Small Business Committee, Mnuchin said the Treasury also planned to issue new guidance this week to ease rules that prohibit business owners with a criminal conviction in the past five years from accessing forgivable Paycheck Protection Program loans.

      That would be reduced to three years, and Mnuchin said he was open to easing the rules further.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
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