1. Articles from USA TODAY

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    1. Mall Owners Simon and Brookfield Acquire Bankrupt J.C. Penney

      Mall Owners Simon and Brookfield Acquire Bankrupt J.C. Penney

      J.C. Penney has reached a tentative deal to sell its business and stores to a group of mall owners and lenders in a move that would save the department store chain from liquidation.

      The retailer disclosed Wednesday during a bankruptcy hearing that it had struck the deal with Simon Property Group, Brookfield Property Group and a group of bankruptcy lenders.

      The deal is expected to save more than 600 stores and 70,000 jobs. The company has separately announced plans to liquidate 242 locations.

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    2. Family Sues Nursing Home After Not Taking COVID-19 Precautions

      Family Sues Nursing Home After Not Taking COVID-19 Precautions

      DETROIT – Dennis Williams is haunted by the memory of his mother, Wanda Parker, through the window at a Michigan nursing home.

      He said she was begging for help.

      It was the last time he saw his 68-year-old mother alive. She died of COVID-19 on April 7, two days after she was transported to a hospital from the Villages of Lapeer Nursing and Rehabilitation.

      Williams said he saw employees of the facility not wearing masks, gloves or other personal protective equipment (PPE) during his through-the-window visits with his mother before she died. He's aware of the lower COVID-19 statistics reported at other nursing homes in the area.

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    3. CDC Removes 14-Day Quarantine Recommendations After Traveling

      CDC Removes 14-Day Quarantine Recommendations After Traveling

      Travelers returning from a trip outside the country or their state no longer face recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to self-quarantine for 14 days upon return. 

      The CDC updated its travel requirements online Friday, advising travelers to "follow state, territorial, tribal and local recommendations or requirements after travel." Previous guidelines recommended a 14-day quarantine for those returning from international destinations or areas with a high concentration of coronavirus cases. 

      Though it still notes that those exposed to the coronavirus pose a risk of infecting others for 14 days, the CDC's page on traveling amid the pandemic recommends that travelers, "regardless of where you traveled or what you did during your trip," follow social distancing guidelines ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    4. NFL Player, Jerome Bettis, Files Discrimination Lawsuit Over Business Deal

      NFL Player, Jerome Bettis, Files Discrimination Lawsuit Over Business Deal

      Jerome Bettis is taking on Pittsburgh-based energy giant EQT in what he says is a fight for racial justice – and an attempt to recoup significant money he says was lost after the termination of a business deal.

      A trucking company partially owned by the Hall of Fame running back, IntegrServ, filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday alleging racial discrimination as the basis that resulted in EQT backing out of an agreement that began as a commitment to use minority-owned businesses. The suit seeks $66 million in damages.

      The former Pittsburgh Steelers star and his brother, John, own 51% of IntegrServ.

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    5. Sarah Palin Gives Advice to Kamala Harris

      Sarah Palin Gives Advice to Kamala Harris

      Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee, offered congratulations and words of advice Tuesday to Sen. Kamala Harris after Joe Biden selected Harris to be his running mate. 

      "Congrats to the democrat VP pick! Climb upon Geraldine Ferraro’s and my shoulders, and from the most amazing view in your life consider lessons we learned," Palin wrote. She and Ferraro – chosen in 1984 as former Vice President Walter Mondale's running mate – were the only other female running mates on major party tickets in U.S. history. 

      Palin had been Alaska's governor for less than two years and was little-known nationally when former Sen. John McCain, the 2008 GOP presidential nominee, chose her as his ...

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      Mentions: Alaska
    6. Big Ten Cancels Football Season Due to COVID Concerns

      Big Ten Cancels Football Season Due to COVID Concerns

      The Big Ten is on the verge of not playing football this fall, three people with knowledge of the decision confirmed to the Detroit Free Press.

      The people requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly on the decision. A formal announcement is expected Tuesday, the people said.

      The situation remains fluid as the details of what happens with a spring season remain unclear.

      The people said the presidents were in agreement Sunday to end fall sports in the conference. Michigan and Michigan State — which both have physicians as presidents — were among the schools in favor of ending the fall seasons, according to those people.  

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    7. Trump Thinks Schools Should Reopen Saying Children are "Virtually Immune"

      Trump Thinks Schools Should Reopen Saying Children are "Virtually Immune"

      WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump defended his call to reopen schools this fall by claiming children are "virtually immune" from COVID-19 and that the coronavirus will "go away" soon.

      “This thing’s going away – It will go away like things go away," Trump said during a wide-ranging interview on "Fox & Friends" a day after authorities reported more than 1,000 Americans died of the virus.

      Children can catch – and pass on – the coronavirus, doctors have said. The National Education Association has cited that in arguing that reopening schools this fall may maintain spikes in the spread of the virus, which has claimed more than 150,000 American lives.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    8. Both President Trump and Nancy Pelosi Slam Deborah Birx

      Both President Trump and Nancy Pelosi Slam Deborah Birx

      WASHINGTON – Deborah Birx, who is coordinating the White House's response to the nation's worsening coronavirus crisis, has achieved an unusual feat: both President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are mad at her.

      Pelosi has said in televised interviews over the past two days that she's unhappy with Birx for not doing more to stand up to the president when he publicly touts his administration's response to the pandemic or endorses unproven remedies to coronavirus.

      Pelosi told CNN Monday that she didn't have "any confidence" in Birx, saying she has "enabled" Trump and has not done enough to set the record straight on his faulty medical claims.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    9. President Trump Won't Pay Respect to John Lewis

      President Trump Won't Pay Respect to John Lewis

      President Donald Trump said Monday he will not be attending memorial services for civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis this week.

      Lewis will lie in state at the Capitol as part of six days of funeral proceedings, and the public will be allowed to visit later Monday and Tuesday. Lewis died July 17 from pancreatic cancer at 80.

      "No, I won't be going, no," Trump told reporters when asked if he would pay respects to Lewis Monday or Tuesday at the Capitol. Trump traveled Monday to to North Carolina to visit a facility working on a COVID-19 vaccine and returned in the early evening.

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      Mentions: Civil Rights
    10. Black Guests Sue Hilton and Other Hotels for Racial Discrimination

      Black Guests Sue Hilton and Other Hotels for Racial Discrimination

      Albert Law had checked into the Hilton Richmond Downtown in Virginia's capital and was waiting in the lobby when a security guard approached him with a question. It floored him.

      "Do you belong here?" the guard inquired, demanding to see his room key and identification. As the only Black person seated near several white people – none of whom was asked the same question – Law was deeply offended, he said in an interview. 

      "It's a level of humiliation you can never get out of your head," said Law, a software executive from the Atlanta suburbs who had come to the hotelfor a law enforcement administrators conference in March 2018.

      Law is one of several Black people who filed lawsuits ...

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    11. Russian Hackers Attempt to Steal Info from COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

      Russian Hackers Attempt to Steal Info from COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

      Hackers backed by the Russian government are attempting to steal information from researchers and pharmaceutical companies racing to find a COVID-19 vaccine, Britain, the United States and Canada alleged Thursday. 

      Britain’s National Cybersecurity Centre said the hackers were "almost certainly" connected to Russia's intelligence services. Britain made the announcement in coordination with authorities in the U.S. and Canada.

      The three nations alleged that hacking group APT29, also known as Cozy Bear, is attacking academic and drug research institutions involved in coronavirus vaccine development. The announcement did not specify which institutions and companies had been targeted or whether any vaccine information had been stolen.  

      "It is completely unacceptable that the Russian Intelligence Services are targeting those working to ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    12. Air Conditioning Systems Could Exacerbate COVID-19 Airborne Transmission

      Air Conditioning Systems Could Exacerbate COVID-19 Airborne Transmission

      Though some public health experts expected coronavirus transmission to wane in the summer as temperatures rise and the air becomes more humid, cases have actually skyrocketed in some of the hottest and stickiest parts of the country.

      Engineers and ventilation experts said this may be in part because residents escape the heat by retreating indoors where heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems could exacerbate airborne transmission with unplanned air currents.

      “The main way (air conditioning) can contribute to spreading coronavirus is by creating strong air currents that can move the droplets … and contribute to increase risk,” said William Bahnfleth, chair of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers’ Epidemic Task Force (ASHRAE) and professor at Penn State ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    13. New York and Company Files Bankruptcy, May Close All Stores

      New York and Company Files Bankruptcy, May Close All Stores

      Women's fashion retailer New York & Company could permanently close all of its stores or a significant portion of them in bankruptcy, parent company RTW Retailwinds, Inc. announced Monday.

      RTW Retailwinds filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Jersey and said in a news release that it has "launched a store closing and liquidation process." 

      Like other apparel retailers with a heavy commitment to shopping malls, the company and its brands were grappling with declining foot traffic long before the coronavirus pandemic, which has led to an increase of retailers filing for bankruptcy.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    14. Coronavirus Surge Leads to Delayed Test Results

      Coronavirus Surge Leads to Delayed Test Results

      America’s testing system is once again strained and labs are struggling to keep pace as coronavirus rages faster than ever in the South and West.

      From Florida to California, large and small labs running 24/7 can’t process samples quickly enough from millions of Americans tested every week. That means COVID-19 test results are delayed a week or longer in hot spot communities, undercutting public health efforts to track, isolate and prevent spread.

      The number of daily tests reached an all-time high of more than 719,000 on July 3 and averaged nearly 640,000 each day this past week, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project.

      Testing centers in Sunbelt cities such as Tallahassee, Florida, and ...

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      Mentions: Florida Coronavirus
    15. Kanye West No Longer Supports Trump, Plans to Run Himself

      Kanye West No Longer Supports Trump, Plans to Run Himself

      Kanye West continues to deliver sensational details about his 2020 presidential run, despite an apparent lack of an actual campaign. The rapper, 43, said in a "rambling" interview Tuesday with Forbes that he contracted the coronavirus in February, no longer supports President Donald Trump and plans to run as a member of the "Birthday Party." 

      “Because when we win, it’s everybody’s birthday," West explained to the outlet.

      In a sudden 180-degree shift after showing public support for the president, West said he has lost confidence in Trump's leadership. "I am taking the red hat off," he said. "It looks like one big mess to me. I don’t like that I caught wind that he hid in ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    16. Woman Faces Charges After Calling Police on Black Bird Watcher

      Woman Faces Charges After Calling Police on Black Bird Watcher

      Amy Cooper, the white woman who called 911 on a Black man who asked that she leash her dog in Central Park, is facing a misdemeanor charge of filing a false report, Manhattan's district attorney announced Monday.

      The incident went viral after a video of Cooper emerged showing the 41-year-old woman frantically calling police when Christian Cooper, a Black man who was bird-watching, told her to leash her dog in the area of the park where leashes are required.

      "Today our Office initiated a prosecution of Amy Cooper for Falsely Reporting an Incident in the Third Degree," Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. said in a statement.

      Charging documents were not immediately available. Amy Cooper, who lost her job ...

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    17. Students Hosting 'COVID Parties' With Cash Reward for Catching Virus

      Students Hosting 'COVID Parties' With Cash Reward for Catching Virus

      As coronavirus cases around the U.S. continue to rise, authorities in one Alabama county may have identified a possible source for their increase. Infected college students.

      Tuscaloosa Fire Rescue Chief Randy Smith said Tuesday that city officials were able to confirm incidents of students knowingly diagnosed with COVID-19 still choosing to attend parties and gatherings within the city and county. “We thought that was kind of a rumor at first,” said Smith, who is heading the city of Tuscaloosa’s Incident Command team in response to the coronavirus. “We did some additional research. Not only did the doctors’ offices help confirm it, but the state confirmed they also had the same information. Smith did not specify how many students ...

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    18. Cirque du Soleil Files for Bankruptcy

      Cirque du Soleil Files for Bankruptcy

      Cirque du Soleil announced Monday it is filing for bankruptcy protection as the coronavirus pandemic continues to rattle the world.

      The entertainment group is working to "restructure its capital structure," according to a statement. Its application will be heard by the Superior Court of Quebec on Tuesday. Once given this initial order, it will file for Chapter 15 bankruptcy protection in the U.S.

      Cirque du Soleil is an institution on the Las Vegas Strip, with its pricey, mesmerizing shows high on visitors’ vacation agendas. The company had six shows operating in major Las Vegas casino hotels when coronavirus crushed travel and closed casinos for nearly three months: "O," "Zumanity,’" "The Beatles LOVE," "Ka," "Mystere," and "Michael Jackson ONE."

      Major ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    19. DNA Aids Investigators in Solving 1982 Murder Case

      DNA Aids Investigators in Solving 1982 Murder Case

      Nearly 40 years ago, eight-year-old Kelly Prosser left her elementary school in Columbus, Ohio. She never arrived home. Two days later she was found dead in a cornfield in a case that puzzled the community and police for decades.

      But on Friday, her family finally got an answer about who killed the child. Columbus police investigators who never gave up on the cold case matched a dead man's DNA to the rape and murder of Kelly.

      "Our family has spent many long years waiting for Kelly Ann's murder to be solved," according to a statement released by Kelly's family after police announced the news. "But Kelly's family is not unique. Those who have suffered the murder ...

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    20. 6 Police Officers Charged for Pulling People Stuck in ATL Protest Traffic from Car

      6 Police Officers Charged for Pulling People Stuck in ATL Protest Traffic from Car

      Six Atlanta police officers have been charged after a dramatic video showed authorities pulling two young people from a car and shooting them with stun guns while they were stuck in traffic caused by protests over George Floyd’s death, a prosecutor said Tuesday.

      Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced the charges during a news conference. Atlanta police did not immediately have a comment Tuesday.

      “I feel a little safer now that these monsters are off of the street and no longer able to terrorize anyone else,” said 22-year-old Messiah Young, who was dragged from the vehicle along with his girlfriend, 20-year-old Taniyah Pilgrim.

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    21. 24 Hour Fitness Allegedly Prepares to File for Bankruptcy

      24 Hour Fitness Allegedly Prepares to File for Bankruptcy

      Gym chain 24 Hour Fitness Worldwide is reportedly preparing to file for bankruptcy, as retailers and other companies navigate the coronavirus pandemic.

      According to The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg, the company is seeking a loan to allow them to keep operating through a restructuring.

      The company has more than $1.3 billion in debt after a buyout by AEA Investors and the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan, reports Bloomberg.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    22. Walt Disney World Sets Reopening Date After Months of Closure Amid Pandemic

      Walt Disney World Sets Reopening Date After Months of Closure Amid Pandemic

      Walt Disney World plans to reopen July 11, according to a presentation the company made to an economic recovery task force Wednesday.

      Disney's Florida theme parks have been closed since March 15 because of the coronavirus pandemic, and their reopening will follow its Florida rival, Universal Orlando, which is set to reopen June 5.

      SeaWorld Orlando also presented its plan to Orange County's Economic Recovery Task Force and plans to reopenfor employees as soon as June 10, and the public on June 11. 

      Jim McPhee, senior vice president of operations for Walt Disney World, said the company plans a phased reopening of the park, with the Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom opening July 11. Epcot and Disney's ...

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      Mentions: Florida Coronavirus
    23. Tuesday Morning Files Chapter 11 Bankruptcy and Plans 230 Store Closings

      Tuesday Morning Files Chapter 11 Bankruptcy and Plans 230 Store Closings

      Off-price retailer Tuesday Morning filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Wednesday with plans to close more than a third of its stores.

      Tuesday Morning had been struggling when the coronavirus pandemic began and went into a free fall when it was forced to temporarily close its locations due to the crisis.

      The company joins a growing list of retailers that have tumbled into Chapter 11 bankruptcy during the pandemic, including J.C. Penney, Neiman Marcus and J. Crew. In each case, the companies were already in rough shape before the pandemic began due to excessive debt and declining foot traffic.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    24. Trump Administration Suspends Travel from Brazil to Limit Spread of COVID-19

      Trump Administration Suspends Travel from Brazil to Limit Spread of COVID-19

       President Donald Trump issued a proclamation Sunday banning people who have been in Brazil within 14 days  from trying to enter the USA in the latest travel restrictions aimed at containing the spread of the coronavirus. 

      The president, citing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Homeland Security, said Brazil was the latest country to face travel restrictions amid a surge in cases of COVID-19, according to the order. The order will take effect Tuesday at 11:59 p.m. EDT after the administration announced it was moving up the ban by two days.

      Brazil is among the hardest hit countries in the coronavirus pandemic, with more than 363,000 cases and more than 22,500 ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
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