1. Articles from USA TODAY

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    1. Lawsuit Alleges Wells Fargo Unfairly Shuffled Paycheck Protection Program Applications in COVID-19 Relief Program

      Lawsuit Alleges Wells Fargo Unfairly Shuffled Paycheck Protection Program Applications in COVID-19 Relief Program

      A California-based company filed a class-action lawsuit against Wells Fargo citing unfair actions against some small businesses seeking government-sponsored coronavirus relief under the Paycheck Protection Program. 

      In March, the Treasury Department announced the $349 billion forgivable loan plan for small businesses that helps them pay employees during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The fund ran out of money on Friday.

      The lawsuit filed on behalf of small business owners on Sunday alleges that Wells Fargo unfairly prioritized businesses seeking large loan amounts, while the government's small business agency has said that PPP loan applications would be processed on a first-come, first-served basis. 

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    2. Media Companies Line Up to Trademark Coronavirus Pandemic

      Media Companies Line Up to Trademark Coronavirus Pandemic

      In the weeks since the coronavirus seized the globe’s attention, dozens of brands, media companies, celebrities and average Joes have filed trademark applications to cash in on newly ubiquitous phrases. 

      Records from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office show that since early March, more than 140 applications have been filed for variations on the words coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic and shelter-in-place. 

      The makers of What Do You Meme?, the party card game similar to Cards Against Humanity, filed March 20 to trademark “Social Distancing. The Game.” A California man filed a wide-ranging claim to the phrase “Love in the Time of Coronavirus” for apparel and entertainment. A Florida man wants to sell "COVID-19 Baby" onesies nine months from now.

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      Mentions: Florida Coronavirus
    3. Old Laws May Shield Cruise Lines From Huge Payouts in Coronavirus Lawsuits

      Old Laws May Shield Cruise Lines From Huge Payouts in Coronavirus Lawsuits

      Debi Chalik listened in horror as Vice President Mike Pence announced at a news conference that 21 passengers aboard the Grand Princess had tested positive for coronavirus. It was Friday, March 6, and her parents were on the cruise. She knew that their ages, 74 and 69, would make them particularly susceptible to the virus.  

      “I was very angry, given that there was no doubt my parents’ lives were placed at imminent risk of serious harm,” Chalik said. As an attorney, Chalik said she thought the cruise line had breached its duty to provide reasonable care for Ronald and Eva Weissberger and the rest of the ship’s 3,500-plus passengers and crew by failing to take precautions to stop ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    4. Scientists Chase Two Options in How to Treat Coronavirus

      Scientists Chase Two Options in How to Treat Coronavirus

      Doctors and scientists are working furiously to find effective treatments for the illness caused by the new coronavirus but are cautioning the public not to self-medicate or hoard mentioned drugs not yet proven to work.

      Despite widespread rumors, social media reports and President Donald Trump's own optimism surrounding the effectiveness of several existing drugs, so far there are no proven treatments for COVID-19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      “There’s no magic drug out there right now,” Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at a news conference Thursday. 

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    5. Furniture Giant Ikea Kept Selling a Dresser it Knew was Dangerous to Children

      Furniture Giant Ikea Kept Selling a Dresser it Knew was Dangerous to Children

      Over the past decade, Ikea’s tip-prone dressers have killed six children, forcing the retail giant to recall millions of bureaus worldwide and pay at least $96 million in settlements to grieving families.

      But last year, when another Ikea dresser no longer met safety standards, the company didn’t rush to take the product off its shelves.

      Instead, it kept selling the dresser.

      Ikea’s three-drawer Kullen dresser became noncompliant with the furniture industry’s safety standard in mid-August after it was updated to further safeguard against the danger of bureaus falling onto children. Sixteen weeks passed before Ikea took the dresser off the market on Dec. 2. Then the company waited again, until last week, to issue a recall ...

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    6. Former Convict in Detroit Becomes First-Time Voter at Age 60

      Former Convict in Detroit Becomes First-Time Voter at Age 60

      For the first time ever, 60-year-old Kerwin Brown-El cast a ballot.

      "It felt really good, really good," he said

      Brown-El couldn't vote because he has been incarcerated. He was released from prison and discharged from parole in 2018. His fiancée, Veronica Harrison, 34, of Detroit helped him fill out his first ballot.

      Brown-El cast his vote in the Michegan Democratic primary for former Vice President Joe Biden at his polling place at Thurgood Marshall Elementary School in Detroit.

      "I feel that he’s going to reinstate a lot of the programs that Donald Trump eliminated," Brown-El said. "We need unification for the country. We’re too angry. We’re too disrespectful."

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    7. Family of Florida Man Killed by Sheriff's Deputy Argues to Overturn $4 Verdict Award

      Family of Florida Man Killed by Sheriff's Deputy Argues to Overturn $4 Verdict Award

      A federal appeals court is a step closer to deciding whether to overturn a $4 verdict awarded by a jury to the family of a man fatally shot six years ago in his Fort Pierce, Florida, home by a St. Lucie County sheriff’s deputy.

      The $4 verdict, which sparked national headlines and stunned the family of Gregory Hill Jr., 30, who was killed in his garage Jan. 14, 2014, was later reduced to 4 cents.

      A panel of three judges seated on the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, in Miami, heard oral arguments Feb. 12 in an appeal filed by Hill’s mother, Viola Bryant, who filed a civil rights and wrongful death lawsuit against St. Lucie ...

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    8. Wells Fargo to Pay $3B Settlement for Violating Antifraud Rules, Resolving Fake Account Probes

      Wells Fargo to Pay $3B Settlement for Violating Antifraud Rules, Resolving Fake Account Probes

      Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $3 billion to settle claims related to its creation of millions of fake accounts to meet sales goals, including $500 million that will be returned to investors, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Friday.

      The agreement, with the SEC and Justice Department, says the banking giant misled investors about its strategy of selling additional financial products to existing customers, according to the SEC. That “cross-sell” strategy was “inflated by accounts and services that were unused, unneeded, or unauthorized,” the SEC said.

      From 2002 to 2016, Wells Fargo opened millions of financial accounts that were unauthorized or fraudulent. Wells Fargo also pressured customers to buy products they didn’t need, the SEC said.

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    9. Putin Sticks Up for Trump

      Putin Sticks Up for Trump

      In a four-hour, televised year-end news conference, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that Democrats used "fabricated reasons" to impeach President Donald Trump over Ukraine because their attempt to link him to Russian election meddling failed.

      Putin also warned of a new arms race if Washington doesn't agree to extend the START nuclear arms agreement with Moscow; said the Kremlin would respond in kind to "unfriendly" new U.S.sanctions; and floated the prospects of amending the Russian constitution to allow him to run for another term,.

      As for Trump's impeachment, the Russian leader called it "just the continuation of the domestic political strife," according to the state-owned TASS News agency.

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    10. Divorce month? January likely to see spike in divorce filings as holidays end

      Divorce month? January likely to see spike in divorce filings as holidays end

      January has earned the nickname "Divorce Month" in legal circles because many couples wait until just after the holiday season to divorce.

      Attorney Laura Wasser, who has represented celebrities such as Angelina Jolie, Johnny Depp and Ashton Kutcher in their divorces, says January has rightfully earned its reputation.

      "It is absolutely true that the first month of the year, and in particular the first half of it, is the highest for either new clients or divorce filings," she says. "Definitely that first week back (after the holidays) is always very busy." In 2018, when Wasser launched her website It's Over Easy, which provides online divorces and serves as a resource for those seeking divorce, she strategically chose the month ...

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    11. NYU study claims construction workers most likely to abuse prescription opioids

      NYU study claims construction workers most likely to abuse prescription opioids

      According to a study published last week by NYU's College of Global Health, workers in the construction industry are most likely to misuse prescription opioids. 

      High rates of injuries from labor intensive work could be a factor that causes the workers to self-medicate with opioids. 

      The study also found a factor was lenient drug policies. Other workplaces with stricter policies were found to have less drug misuse. 

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    12. Trump loses big to Biden, Warren, Sanders, Buttigieg, Harris in poll

      Trump loses big to Biden, Warren, Sanders, Buttigieg, Harris in poll

      President Donald Trump loses in a hypothetical matchup with all the leading candidates for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll released Tuesday. 

      Trump – who has a job approval rating 20 percentage points lower than his disapproval rating of 58% – trails by sizable margins against former Vice President Joe Biden (56%-39%); Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts (54%-39%); Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont (56%-39%); South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg (52%-41%); and Sen. Kamala Harris of California (52%-41%). 

      Each of those Democratic candidates performed well against Trump in a Post-ABC poll Sept. 5, and all of them expanded those leads in this week's survey. 

      Experts said a national poll more ...

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      Mentions: Massachusetts
    13. Woman facing criminal charge for not returning 2 library books

      Woman facing criminal charge for not returning 2 library books

      A Michigan woman was surprised to find out Tuesday she had a warrant out for her arrest — for failing to return two library books. 

      Mindy Jones, 27, learned of the warrant Tuesday afternoon after her boss conducted a background check she needed for a promotion.

      Jones is charged with misdemeanor failure to return rental property, punishable by up to 93 days in jail or a $500 fine. The Charlotte Community Library pursued the charges.

      "This is kind of extreme for two library books," Jones said. "I work full-time and I'm a mom. I'm the head of my household. I can’t afford to take off work for two library books."

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    14. Prosecutors want black judge who criticized incarceration rates of African Americans remove

      Prosecutors want black judge who criticized incarceration rates of African Americans remove

      Two state judges will begin hearing arguments this week about whether an African American Iberia Parish judge should be recused from more than 300 criminal cases after she criticized prosecutors for a high rate of incarceration of black Louisianans.

      The comments by 16th Judicial District Court Judge Lori Landry about the treatment of black defendants have prompted claims of bias by the district attorney's office and support from community members who believe the judge is being treated unfairly.

      Prosecutors with 16th Judicial District Attorney Bo Duhé's office filed motions for recusal in Landry's cases, arguing she should be removed because she is "biased or prejudiced against (the DA's office) such that she cannot be fair or ...

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    15. Destination Maternity to close 183 stores in Chapter 11 bankruptcy

      Destination Maternity to close 183 stores in Chapter 11 bankruptcy

      Destination Maternity filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday, as the apparel company hopes to avoid the growing graveyard of fashion retailers felled by expensive leases and digital competition.

      The retailer operates stores under several brands, including Destination Maternity, Motherhood Maternity and A Pea in the Pod.

      The company had 446 stores in the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico as of Aug. 3. It also operated 491 shops-within-a-shop at various department stores and baby specialty retailers.

      The company plans to close 183 stores after already shuttering 27 recently, according to a court filing. Bankruptcy allows companies to escape unprofitable leases.

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    16. Cincinnati outlaws discrimination based on natural hairstyles associated with race

      Cincinnati outlaws discrimination based on natural hairstyles associated with race

      The Cincinnati City Council voted 7-1 to make it illegal to discriminate against people with natural hair.

      Cincinnati is the second city in the country, after New York City, to pass such a law. At the state level, California and New York have this law and Kentucky is considering one.

      Women turned out during public comment session to tell stories of the discrimination they faced based on how they wear their hair.

      The ordinance's sponsor, Councilman Chris Seelbach, called it "one more step along an important path toward leveling the playing field in the community."

      Vice Mayor Christopher Smitherman, whose wife, Pamela, died earlier this year, said they had long talks about how he would care for their young ...

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    17. Warrant out for R. Kelly, a no-show at hearing on sex crimes

      Warrant out for R. Kelly, a no-show at hearing on sex crimes

      R. Kelly failed to appear in court in Minneapolis on Thursday to face two sex-crime charges, leading to a bench warrant issued for his arrest. He was to make his first appearance in Hennepin County, Minnesota, on charges of child prostitution and solicitation stemming from a 2001 encounter with a teen girl, in the fourth of four sets of sex-crime charges pending against him in state and federal courts in three states.

      Kelly, 52, is currently locked up in a federal detention center in Chicago after he was indicted in Illinois and in New York on multiple sex crimes. R. Kelly leaves court in Chicago on June 6, 2019. R. Kelly leaves court in Chicago on June 6, 2019. (Photo ...

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    18. Oklahoma's Victory Over J&J Sends Hope to States

      Oklahoma's Victory Over J&J Sends Hope to States

      Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter has declared the state victory a roadmap for other states participating in their own opioid litigation. He claims "We did it in Oklahoma. You can do it elsewhere."

      While the Oklahoma state case's ruling depended on a public nuisance claim, lawyers across the country are considering a variety of legal theories. Other claims could be misrepresentation and consumer fraud. 

      Time will tell how other state cases litigate, and legal theories could depend on which opioid manufacturers and distributors file for bankruptcy.

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    19. Avenue Stores Hits Ch. 11 and Closes All 222 Locations

      Avenue Stores Hits Ch. 11 and Closes All 222 Locations

      Plus-size retailer the Avenue will close its 222 stores in 33 states, according to a press release from liquidation company Hilco Merchant Resources Wednesday. Hilco is managing the liquidation with Gordon Brothers.

      On Friday, Avenue Stores, LLC, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, according to court records. In 2012, Versa Capital Management, a private equity company, acquired the retailer in a bankruptcy auction. At the time, there were 433 Avenue locations.

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    20. Perkins & Marie Callender's close 29 locations, file Chapter 11

      Perkins & Marie Callender's close 29 locations, file Chapter 11

      A day after closing 29 restaurant locations, Perkins & Marie Callender’s LLC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Restaurant chain and pie maker owes lenders over $100 million. Approximately 1,190 employees are affected by the closings.

      The Memphis, Tennessee-based company said it plans to sell its Perkins’ business and a segment of its Foxtail bakery business, which supplies to its restaurants and distributors to “Perkins Group LLC.”  This is an arrangement known as a "stalking horse" bid and sets a floor for bidding on the company's assets with a court-supervised auction expected in September.

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    21. Hey 'Moscow Mitch,' the Russians are coming. Again.

      Hey 'Moscow Mitch,' the Russians are coming. Again.

      The Secure Elections Act would ensure a paper audit of election results to help guard against fraud. Other bipartisan legislation would criminalize any hacking of voting systems, with severe sanctions to follow. Last week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked two Democratic proposals he found too partisan. If McConnell dislikes the "Moscow Mitch " moniker as much as he says, he'll find a way to work across party lines to better protect America's democracy.

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    22. Capital One hacker may have data from other companies

      Capital One hacker may have data from other companies

      A Seattle woman who is charged with taking data on more than 100 million customers from Capital One is reportedly a former Amazon Web Services systems engineer who may have accessed data from more companies. Paige A. Thompson, 33, is charged with computer fraud and abuse in a criminal case filed Monday in federal court in Seattle.

      Capital One was notified in an email tip on July 17 that some of the acquired data was being stored on Github, an online platform with more than 36 million users. Also in that Github account, timestamped April 21, 2019, was Thompson's resume.

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    23. American Consumers May Be Affected By The Storming Of Area 51

      American Consumers May Be Affected By The Storming Of Area 51

      Over 1.2 million people have vowed to leave their jobs and protest the government by storming Area 51 to discover the extraterrestrial secrets that lie within.  Millions more have marked themselves as interested. This means U.S. citizens leaving their jobs, to uncover alleged government secrets, causing the government to take action to prevent civilians from interfering with the test base. 

      This could in turn affect the economy in some areas, with more than a million set to arrive in Lincoln County, Nevada September 20th from 3-6. This joke event has caught the attention of the Air Force who mentioned that it was highly discouraged that citizens storm Area 51 because it is an open training range. This could ...

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    24. Trump’s July 4th event bankrupted D.C. security fund

      Trump’s July 4th event bankrupted D.C. security fund

      District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser government says that the cost of President Donald Trump's Fourth of July celebration and the cost of addressing recent protests has emptied out a municipal fund used to provide security for public events and defend against terrorist threats.

      In a letter to Trump dated July 9, Bowser says the city spent about $1.7 million on Trump's "July 4th holiday activities and subsequent first amendment demonstrations," as a result, the city's Emergency Planning and Security Fund (EPSF) will likely be empty before the end of the fiscal year. Bowser asked for the Trump administration's help in covering D.C.'s security costs, citing "declining reserves, increased demand for heightened security ...

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    25-48 of 53 « 1 2 3 »
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