1. Articles from CBS News

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    1. Republican Leaders Outline Priorities for $1 Trillion Coronavirus Relief Bill

      Republican Leaders Outline Priorities for $1 Trillion Coronavirus Relief Bill

      With the coronavirus crisis worsening in more than 40 states and the District of Columbia, President Trump and Republican leaders met Monday to outline their priorities for another federal relief package that is expected to carry a price tag of at least $1 trillion.

      Mr. Trump gathered in the Oval Office on Monday with Vice President Mike Pence, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to discuss the broad contours of a next legislative package, known as "phase 4" legislation, which they intend to discuss with GOP senators on Tuesday.

      "Kids in school, jobs and health care is the theme of the proposal that we hope to come together and present to ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    2. Toxic Hand Sanitizers Containing Methanol Recalled

      Toxic Hand Sanitizers Containing Methanol Recalled

      Two brands of hand sanitizer are being recalled by their manufacturers due to methanol, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The recalls come after the agency warned consumers against buying more than a dozen brands of hand sanitizer that tested positive for the toxic substance, including the two under recall.

      ITECH 361 is recalling almost 19,000 bottles of All Clean Hand Sanitizer, Moisturizer and Disinfectant, with UPC Code 628055370130 and sold in one liter bottles, because of the potential presence of methanol. The product was sold nationally to both wholesale distributors and to retailers.

      The second recall is from Transliquid Technologies LLC, which is recalling all Mystic Shield Protection Topical Solution packaged in 8.45 ounce (250 ml ...

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    3. "The Worst is Yet to Come", WHO Warns

      "The Worst is Yet to Come", WHO Warns

      Six months since the new coronavirus outbreak, the pandemic is still far from over, the World Health Organization said Monday, warning that "the worst is yet to come." Reaching the half-year milestone just as the death toll surpassed 500,000 and the number of confirmed infections topped 10 million, the WHO said it was a moment to recommit to the fight to save lives.

      "Six months ago, none of us could have imagined how our world -- and our lives -- would be thrown into turmoil by this new virus," WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told a virtual briefing. "We all want this to be over. We all want to get on with our lives. But the hard reality is this is ...

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    4. Fauci Declares U.S. Still in "First Wave" of Pandemic

      Fauci Declares U.S. Still in "First Wave" of Pandemic

      Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, says the United States is still in its first wave of the coronavirus pandemic – a warning that comes as states reopen despite rising case numbers. 

      "People keep talking about a second wave," Fauci said in an interview Tuesday with The Wall Street Journal. "We're still in a first wave." 

      At least 19 states have seen new COVID-19 cases go up in the last two weeks, and six states on Tuesday reported record-high single-day jumps in new cases, CBS News' Manuel Bojorquez reported. 

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    5. Morgan Stanley Sued for Discrimination by Former Head of Diversity

      Morgan Stanley Sued for Discrimination by Former Head of Diversity

      The former head of diversity at Morgan Stanley is suing the firm and two of its top executives, including CEO James Gorman, for racial and gender discrimination.

       According to the lawsuit, which was filed on Tuesday, Marilyn Booker was fired in December after pushing for a plan that she said would help promote career advancement for Morgan Stanley's black employees. The suit alleges that Booker's firing reflects a pattern of widespread discrimination against black and female employees at the investment bank.

      "Clearly, black lives did not matter at Morgan Stanley," the suit states.

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    6. Trump Admin. to Roll Back Transgender Healthcare Protections

      Trump Admin. to Roll Back Transgender Healthcare Protections

      Just two weeks into Pride Month — and on the anniversary of the Pulse nightclub shooting — the Trump administration announced that it is rolling back Obama-era health care protections for people who are transgender. The rule, announced Friday, will impact transgender patients' ability to fight against discrimination by doctors, medical facilities and health insurance providers. 

      Former president Barack Obama's administration changed federal health care guidelines in 2016 to expand sex-based protections based to include protections based on gender identity, "which may be male, female, neither, or a combination of male and female." His administration also pushed for discrimination protections for those who have had abortions. 

      But the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released a statement on Friday saying ...

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    7. Stocks Tumble Amid Pandemic and Fed's Recent Comments

      Stocks Tumble Amid Pandemic and Fed's Recent Comments

      Stocks stumbled on Thursday amid a rising number of coronavirus infections in many U.S. states and countries, raising fears on Wall Street about the impact on the economy's recovery. The slump also comes after the Federal Reserve's forecast on Wednesday that as many as 15 million Americans will remain unemployed by year-end into 2021. 

      The Dow Jones industrial average plunged 1,862 points, or 6.9%, to 25,128. The broader S&P 500-stock index fell 5.9% and the tech-heavy Nasdaq composite slipped 5.3%. 

      Stocks have been rallying over the past two months at a rate that many skeptics said was unsustainable and that didn't reflect the dire condition of the American economy. The ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    8. Trump Says He Only Went to Underground Bunker to 'Inspect It'

      Trump Says He Only Went to Underground Bunker to 'Inspect It'

      President Trump acknowledges that he went to the bunker underneath the White House Friday, but claimed he did so more for an "inspection." He also said that he went in the afternoon, not in the evening as had been reported, when the scene outside the White House became much more chaotic. 

      In a Fox News Radio interview Wednesday, the president said he was only in the bunker for "a short period of time" and claimed the Secret Service had told him it would be a good time to look at the bunker because "maybe sometime you're going to need it." 

      The New York Times first reported the president went to the bunker Friday night for nearly an hour as ...

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    9. Poll Shows Only Half Of Americans Would Get COVID-19 Vaccine

      Poll Shows Only Half Of Americans Would Get COVID-19 Vaccine

      Only about half of Americans say they would get a COVID-19 vaccine if the scientists working furiously to create one succeed, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

      That's surprisingly low considering the being put into the global race for a vaccine against the coronavirus that's sparked a pandemic since first emerging from China late last year. But more people might eventually roll up their sleeves: The poll, released Wednesday, found 31% simply weren't sure if they'd get vaccinated. One-in-five said they'd refuse.

      Health experts already worry about the whiplash if vaccine promises like President Trump's goal of a 300 million-dose stockpile by January fail. Only time ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    10. Trump Sued for Blocking Stimulus Checks to Americans Married to Immigrants

      Trump Sued for Blocking Stimulus Checks to Americans Married to Immigrants

      President Donald Trump faces a lawsuit over the federal government declining to make $1,200 stimulus checks to U.S. citizens who are married to immigrants without Social Security numbers. The litigation comes after the IRS said only married couples who both hold valid Social Security numbers will receive the payments.

      The stimulus checks are part of the government's $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package, which provides $1,200 for single taxpayers earning less than $75,000 and $2,400 for married ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    11. Coronavirus Crisis Thrusts Politically Charged Legal Battles Before Supreme Court

      Coronavirus Crisis Thrusts Politically Charged Legal Battles Before Supreme Court

      The ongoing coronavirus crisis has spurred governors of nearly all 50 states to issue orders requiring residents to remain in their homes and mandating certain businesses and schools close their doors to slow the spread of the sometimes fatal illness.

      But the efforts related to the public-health crisis have also sparked a flurry of activity in the federal courts, as the coronavirus becomes a factor in politically charged cases dealing with voting rights, abortion and immigration that are weaving their way closer to or have already arrived at the Supreme Court.

      The first legal battle stemming from the coronavirus landed before the justices last week when GOP lawmakers in Wisconsin and the Republican National Committee (RNC) asked the high court ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    12. LeBron James's Media Company Accused of Infringing Trademark

      LeBron James's Media Company Accused of Infringing Trademark

      Professional basketball star LeBron James and his digital media company have unfairly profited from using a slogan trademarked almost two years ago by a Maryland nonprofit, a lawsuit filed this week alleges. 

      The complaint also names ESPN, Nike and video game company Take-Two Interactive as defendants. 

      "Uninterrupted, with the help of the most recognizable athlete in the world and the most prominent athletic clothing company and sports media ...

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    13. 6-year-old Florida Girl "Traumatized" After Being Involuntarily Sent to Mental Health Facility

      6-year-old Florida Girl "Traumatized" After Being Involuntarily Sent to Mental Health Facility

      A 6-year-old girl in Florida is "traumatized" after being sent to a mental health facility following an incident at her Jacksonville elementary school, her mother said. Nadia Falk was allegedly "out of control," but her mom says she has special needs and is questioning the state law that allowed her to be committed to the facility.

      According to a sheriff's report, a social worker who responded to Nadia's tantrum at Love Grove Elementary School stated the girl was a "threat to herself and others," "destroying school property" and "attacking staff."

      She was removed from school and committed to a behavioral health center for a psychiatric evaluation under the Baker Act, which allows authorities to force such an evaluation ...

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      Mentions: Florida
    14. Man Arrested in Arizona with $4M Worth of Drugs in His Car

      Man Arrested in Arizona with $4M Worth of Drugs in His Car

      A man from Utah was arrested this week when police found almost $4 million worth of illicit drugs in his car in Arizona. Logan Lewis Pederson, 30, was pulled over on Interstate 15 near the Utah border.

      Pedersen "appeared extremely nervous" during the traffic stop. The station said a St. George Police Department K9 unit assisted and that's when the narcotics were found inside his white sedan. 

      When the vehicle was searched, here's what police found:

      • Six 1-gallon jugs, weighing a total of 66 pounds, filled with a liquid substance that field tested positive for methamphetamine.
      • Six bricks of cocaine which weighed 13.2 pounds.
      • 1,000 packages of candy infused with THC that weighed 206 pounds.
      • 2 ...
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    15. FDA faces blame in opioid epidemic

      FDA faces blame in opioid epidemic

      A recently released report found that the Food and Drug Administration was plagued by a lack of training and oversight during the opioid crisis contributing to the epidemic that kills tens of thousands each year.

      The FDA may have failed to set strict enough standards and follow-through training for doctors about the risks associated with prescription opioids.

      A big problem was that the FDA let pharmaceutical companies develop the standards, and did not discourage aggressive marketing. 

       

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    16. Babies born with NAS cost the U.S. more than half a billion each year

      Babies born with NAS cost the U.S. more than half a billion each year

      The cost of babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which is opioid withdrawal due to the mother's opioid intake, amounts to over $500 million each year and 4/5ths of this money comes from medicaid.

      Findings published Dec. 16 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, explain that it is clear that state and federal governments ultimately bear this billion dollar burden.

      Dr. Stephen Patrick, director of Vanderbilt University's Center for Child Health Policy in Nashville, Tenn. believes that babies with NAS should be at the center of settlement discussions as they were a strong motivating factor for the opioid litigation. 

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    17. Dems look to win governor's races in the heart of Trump country on Tuesday

      Dems look to win governor's races in the heart of Trump country on Tuesday

      In what would be a troubling sign for Republicans ahead of next year's elections, Democrats have a shot at seizing the governor's mansions in two Southern states President Trump won handily in 2016.

      Trump has held rallies for the Republican nominees in both states as Republicans try to focus both races on national issues such as immigration and impeachment. The president remains popular in Kentucky and Mississippi and hopes he ...

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    18. Opioid Crisis Forcing Kids into Foster Care

      Opioid Crisis Forcing Kids into Foster Care

      The opioid crisis is putting a tremendous amount of pressure on the foster care system. 

      After the $260 million settlement in Ohio, many states are considering the potential of using their own settlement money toward the entities in their state affected most by the crisis. 

      Foster programs have taken a hard impact economically, and are likely to gain support financially from settlement funds.

      The children in these homes are often thankful for the opportunity to get out of drug/opioid-ridden homes so they do not end up in the same situation their parents are in.

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    19. How big companies are reshaping the gun control debat

      How big companies are reshaping the gun control debat

      Overseeing more than 720 stores in 47 states, Ed Stack, the CEO of Dick's Sporting Goods, has a multi-billion-dollar empire to run. But Stack is now balancing running a business with his new role as one of the corporate faces of America's gun control debate.

      It's a pretty controversial stand from a company that's been in the gun business a long, long time. His father, Richard Stack, started Dick's Bait and Tackle in Binghamton, New York in 1948. As Dick's grew, it became one of the biggest sellers of firearms. Until, that is, 2012, when a gunman opened fire at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

      "All we were going to do was ...

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      Mentions: gun control
    20. What is treason and who can be convicted of it?

      What is treason and who can be convicted of it?

      A look at the slim history of treason cases in U.S. history shows there's little chance Trump or Schiff — or anyone else in the federal government, for that matter — would ever face a treason charge. Their behavior does not fit the definition of treason — but also, treason cases have been nearly nonexistent in the U.S. for decades.

      Treason is the only crime that is explicitly defined in the U.S. Constitution, which describes it as when someone "owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere."

      The Constitution says that a person convicted of treason should "suffer death," or be ...

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    21. Arby's parent buys Jimmy John's Sandwiches

      Arby's parent buys Jimmy John's Sandwiches

      The parent company of Arby's is buying Jimmy John's Sandwiches, hoping to reverse sluggish sales at the chain.

      Jimmy John's founder and chairman, Jimmy John Liautaud, will step down and become an adviser to Inspire's board. James North, Jimmy John's president and CEO, will serve as president and report to Inspire CEO Paul Brown.

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    22. Federal government closes 6 civil rights cold cases

      Federal government closes 6 civil rights cold cases

      The federal government is still investigating the brutal slaying of black teenager Emmett Till, whose death in 1955 helped spur the civil rights movement. A Justice Department report issued to Congress about civil rights cold case investigations lists Till's killing as being among the unit's active cases.

      The inquiry was reopened two years after a book indicated a key witness had lied. "The Blood of Emmett Till," by Timothy B. Tyson, quotes a white woman, Carolyn Donham, as acknowledging during a 2008 interview that she wasn't truthful when she testified that Till grabbed her, whistled and made sexual advances at a store in 1955.

      "She said with respect to the physical assault on her, or anything menacing ...

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      Mentions: Civil Rights
    23. A New York diocese filed for bankruptcy. Why more may follow

      A New York diocese filed for bankruptcy. Why more may follow

      The Roman Catholic Diocese of Rochester was the first in New York to seek bankruptcy protection under the financial weight of new sexual misconduct lawsuits, but lawyers and church leaders say it may not be the last. The state's eight Roman Catholic dioceses are facing financial pressures as a result of the state's new Child Victims Act.

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    24. El Paso shooter indicted on capital murder charges

      El Paso shooter indicted on capital murder charges

      A man accused of gunning down people at a busy Walmart in El Paso last month was indicted Thursday for capital murder. The District Attorney's Office said it "will continue to work hard to ensure that justice is done and is committed to assisting the victims through the judicial process."

      Patrick Crusius, 21, of Allen, Texas, was indicted on one count in connection with the August 3 mass shooting that left 22 dead, District Attorney Jaime Esparza said. El Paso prosecutors are seeking the death penalty for Crusius, who remains jailed without bond. The massacre was the first in a series of mass shootings last month that left dozens dead and, again, brought the debate over guns into the ...

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    1-24 of 33 1 2 »
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