1. Articles from NBC News

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    1. Trump Supporters Charged After Defacing 'Black Lives Matter' Mural

      Trump Supporters Charged After Defacing 'Black Lives Matter' Mural

      Two San Francisco-area residents accused of painting over a "Black Lives Matter" mural are facing hate crime charges. Nicole Anderson, 42, and David Nelson, 53, both of Martinez, were charged Tuesday with three misdemeanor counts, including a hate crime violation, the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office said in a statement.

      The July 4 incident was captured on video that shows a woman splattering black paint on the yellow block letters on a downtown Martinez street and then using a roller to cover some of the letters in the mural, which was city approved.

      In the video, which had previously been shared on social media and by the Martinez Police Department, a man can be heard saying, "the narrative ...

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    2. US Records 3 Millionth Coronavirus Case

      US Records 3 Millionth Coronavirus Case

      The U.S. has reached a milestone that seemed unthinkable just a few months ago — the 3 millionth case of coronavirus.

      There were 3,000,012 confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of 11 p.m.Tuesday and around 10 percent of those (317,654) were reported since July 1, figures compiled by NBC News showed.

       Meanwhile, the death toll was 131,661 and rising as the pandemic maintained a tragic trajectory.

      President Donald Trump, who just a week ago was saying the coronavirus would “just disappear,” insisted in a tweet that COVID-19 deaths rates were down 39 percent and that the U.S. had the lowest death rate “in the world.”

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    3. Racial Justice Advocates Celebrate Surprise Cancellation of $8B Gas Pipeline

      Racial Justice Advocates Celebrate Surprise Cancellation of $8B Gas Pipeline

      Ella Rose had returned home from church on Sunday, ready to settle in for the afternoon, when her phone rang. It was a friend, Chad Oba, delivering unexpected news: The Atlantic Coast Pipeline, the proposed multibillion-dollar project that had consumed their lives for the past six years, was no more.

      It was officially canceled. 

      "My reaction was 'hallelujah,'" Rose, 76, recalled Monday. "I was so elated that I started praising God."

      After protracted legal conflicts and a wave of delays, the two energy companies partnering on the project, Dominion Energy in Richmond, Virginia, and Duke Energy in Charlotte, North Carolina, announced they were abandoning the joint venture, a natural gas pipeline that was supposed to zigzag about 600 miles through ...

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    4. ICE Announces International Students Must Leave if School Goes Online-Only

      ICE Announces International Students Must Leave if School Goes Online-Only

      The government announced Monday that international students will not be allowed to stay in the country if the institution in which they're enrolled is holding online-only courses this fall, and those failing to comply with the rules will risk deportation.

      Students on F-1 and M-1 visas who face such a situation "must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status," the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency said in a news release.

      Those who violate the rules "may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings," the agency said.

      The news comes as some colleges and universities, including Harvard, have announced they ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    5. JP Morgan Chase Launches Online Program for Black College Graduates

      JP Morgan Chase Launches Online Program for Black College Graduates

      When Sekou Kaalund started a job as a 22-year-old in New York, rent was so expensive that he contemplated ending his 401(k) savings enrollment plan so he could get more in his paycheck.

      He was advised not to make the move, told that the company was matching his contributions and that it would be worth the investment. He took the advice. "Seventeen years later, that nuanced decision has probably quadrupled the investment," Kaalund said.

       Those kinds of financial lessons and more are being offered to recent graduates of historically black colleges through the Advancing Black Pathways Career Readiness Series, an online program launched by JPMorgan Chase for recent graduates of historically Black colleges and young professionals of color.

      "The ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    6. Fort Lauderdale Officer Faces Criminal Charges After Shoving Protester

      Fort Lauderdale Officer Faces Criminal Charges After Shoving Protester

      A Fort Lauderdale police officer captured on video last month appearing to push over a kneeling protester who had her hands up was charged with battery on Tuesday, authorities said.

      Charging documents filed in Broward County circuit court allege that the officer, Steven Pohorence, 29, intentionally struck or touched the protester on May 31. The charge, a first-degree misdemeanor, was filed after an investigation by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and carries a maximum sentence of one year in jail, the office of state attorney Michael Satz said in a statement.

      The demonstration, held in the wake of George Floyd’s May 25 death while in Minneapolis police custody, began on a Sunday afternoon with hundreds of protesters peacefully ...

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      Mentions: Florida
    7. Fauci Predicts US Coronavirus Cases Could Reach 100,000 Per Day

      Fauci Predicts US Coronavirus Cases Could Reach 100,000 Per Day

      Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, warned members of Congress on Tuesday that the U.S. could reach 100,000 new COVID-19 cases per day if the country does not get a handle on the pandemic.

      Speaking before the Senate health committee, Fauci said the country is heading in the “wrong direction" as the average number of daily cases continues to go up. 

      “We need to do something about that and we need to do it very quickly," said Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. 

      The U.S. is now recording 40,000 new cases per day, surpassing previous records set in April when New York was the epicenter of the ...

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    8. COVID-19 Deaths Surpass 500,000 Globally

      COVID-19 Deaths Surpass 500,000 Globally

      The global death toll from COVID-19 surpassed 500,000 Sunday, while the number of confirmed cases worldwide reach 10 million, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

      The number of cases worldwide marks a milestone in the spread of the virus, believed to have originated in China late last year. However, with testing still limited in some parts of the world, the actual number of global cases could be significantly higher.

      The United States continues to lead in the number of confirmed cases, with more than 2.5 million and a death toll of 126,332 by Sunday afternoon, according to NBC News' tally.

      Vice President Mike Pence postponed planned campaign appearances in Arizona and Florida this week "out ...

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      Mentions: top story
    9. CDC Estimates 10 Undiagnosed Coronavirus Cases for Every 1 Diagnosed

      CDC Estimates 10 Undiagnosed Coronavirus Cases for Every 1 Diagnosed

      The true number of Americans who've been infected with COVID-19 may top 20 million, according to new estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Our best estimate right now is that for every case that's reported, there actually are 10 other infections," Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the CDC, said on a call with reporters Thursday.

      The assessment comes from looking at blood samples across the country for the presence of antibodies to the virus. For every confirmed case of COVID-19, 10 more people had antibodies, Redfield said, referring to proteins in the blood that indicate whether a person's immune system has previously fought off the coronavirus. Those samples aren't just from people who ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    10. NYPD Officer Faces Charges After Putting Man in Chokehold

      NYPD Officer Faces Charges After Putting Man in Chokehold

      A New York City police officer seen on video putting a man in an apparent chokehold on a Queens boardwalk was arrested and charged Thursday. Officer David Afanador, who was suspended without pay following Sunday's incident with Ricky Bellevue, faces charges of strangulation and attempted strangulation, the New York City Police Department said.

      The NYPD and the city's Police Benevolent Association, which represents officers, did not immediately return requests for comment on Thursday.

      Police were called to the boardwalk at Rockaway Beach on Sunday morning for a report that a man was harassing people and throwing objects at them. In body-camera video released by police, several officers are seen talking to Bellevue, who is Black, and two other ...

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    11. US Breaks Single-Day Record of Coronavirus Cases

      US Breaks Single-Day Record of Coronavirus Cases

      The U.S. saw a record number of new coronavirus cases in a single day, with 45,557 diagnoses reported Wednesday, according to a tally by NBC News.

      Wednesday's cases top the previous highest daily count from April 26 — during the first peak of the pandemic in the U.S. — by more than 9,000 cases, according to NBC News' tracking data. The World Health Organization reported its single-day record on Sunday, with more than 183,000 new cases worldwide.

      Health experts said Monday that the resurgence in cases in Southern and Western states can be traced to Memorial Day, when many officials began loosening lockdowns and reopening businesses.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    12. Over $10B Settlement Reached in Roundup Cancer Lawsuits

      Over $10B Settlement Reached in Roundup Cancer Lawsuits

      Bayer will pay more than $10 billion to resolve thousands of lawsuits regarding claims that its herbicide Roundup causes cancer, the company announced Wednesday.

      Monsanto, which Bayer bought in 2018, lost a lawsuit that same year brought by a school groundskeeper who claimed its weedkiller had caused his non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Since then, thousands of U.S. lawsuits have been filed against the company.

       Bayer CEO Werner Baumann called the decision to settle the lawsuits the right one in order to end a long period of uncertainty. “The decision to resolve the Roundup litigation enables us to focus fully on the critical supply of health care and food,” he said in statement. “It will also return the conversation about the safety ...
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    13. US to Increase COVID-19 Testing, Despite Trump's Claims

      US to Increase COVID-19 Testing, Despite Trump's Claims

      Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday that the federal government is trying to expand testing, not slow it down as President Donald Trump has suggested in recent days.

      In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, was asked about the president's recent comments and whether he agrees that it makes sense to limit the number of COVID-19 tests.

      "It's the opposite. We're going to be doing more testing, not less," said Fauci, who has played a key role in the Trump administration's response to the pandemic. Fauci said that to his knowledge, "None of us have ever been told to slow down on testing — that ...

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    14. Trump Confirms Release of Another COVID-19 Stimulus Package

      Trump Confirms Release of Another COVID-19 Stimulus Package

      President Donald Trump indicated Monday he's open to a second round of stimulus payments as the U.S. economy continues to reel from the coronavirus pandemic.

      Asked in an interview with Scripps local TV news whether he's going to give Americans another round of checks, Trump responded: "Yeah, we are. We are."

      "We will be doing another stimulus package. It'll be very good. It'll be very generous," Trump said. When asked how much money it will be, he said: "You'll find out about it. You'll find out."
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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    15. Former Officers Charged in Rayshard Brooks Murder Turn Themselves In

      Former Officers Charged in Rayshard Brooks Murder Turn Themselves In

      An Atlanta police officer charged with fatally shooting Rayshard Brooks in a Wendy's parking lot and a second officer who was at the scene have turned themselves in.

      Now-former officer Garrett Rolfe surrendered Thursday afternoon, according to records. Rolfe faces 11 counts including felony murder, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, criminal damage to property and violation of oath.

      Don Samuel, an attorney for officer Devin Brosnan, said earlier Thursday that his client had arrived at the Fulton County Jail. Brosnan was charged with one count of aggravated assault and two counts of violation of oath.
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    16. African American Participation is Essential to Developing Successful Vaccine

      African American Participation is Essential to Developing Successful Vaccine

      Calethia Hodges has an arduous task: persuade Black people who have a deep mistrust of experimental drugs and medical institutions to participate in clinical trials to help find a vaccine for the deadly coronavirus.

      It is quite the paradox. African Americans have been disproportionately devastated by COVID-19, but they are inadequately represented in human studies that would treat a disease that has claimed more than 116,000 lives in the United States. Almost a quarter of those were Black, according to a study called Color of Coronavirus by APM Research Lab.

      "And that's why I do what I do," said Hodges, a clinician at Infinite Clinical Trials outside Atlanta. "And that's why I am here, in this neighborhood ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    17. Lawyer Tells Judge He Must Dismiss Criminal Case Against Michael Flynn

      Lawyer Tells Judge He Must Dismiss Criminal Case Against Michael Flynn

      Lawyers for Michael Flynn and the Justice Department told a federal judge on Wednesday that he must agree to dismiss the criminal case against President Donald Trump's former national security adviser because the judge has no authority to do anything else.

      They were responding to a court filing from John Gleeson, a retired judge appointed to act as a friend of the court. Gleeson's assignment was to argue the opposite — that the judge has the power to decide whether to let the government drop the case that accused Flynn of lying to the FBI about his conversations with Russia's ambassador to the United States.

       Gleeson told Federal District Court Judge Emmet Sullivan last week that the Justice ...
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    18. Common Steroid First Drug Proven to Reduce COVID-19 Deaths

      Common Steroid First Drug Proven to Reduce COVID-19 Deaths

      A common steroid drug that's been used for decades to treat conditions from altitude sickness to eye inflammation has been shown to reduce deaths by a third in the sickest patients in the hospital with COVID-19, British scientists say.

      This is the first time, the researchers say, that a drug has been shown to have an effect on deaths rates of the virus that's killed more than 110,000 people in the U.S.

      Researchers at the University of Oxford in the U.K. compared outcomes of 2,104 hospitalized patients who received the steroid, called dexamethasone, with 4,321 patients who did not.

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    19. Supreme Court Bans Discrimination of LGBTQ Workers

      Supreme Court Bans Discrimination of LGBTQ Workers

      The Supreme Court ruled Monday that existing federal law forbids job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or transgender status, a major victory for advocates of gay rights and for the nascent transgender rights movement — and a surprising one from an increasingly conservative court.

      By a vote of 6-3, the court said Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which makes it illegal for employers to discriminate because of a person's sex, among other factors, also covers sexual orientation and transgender status. It upheld rulings from lower courts that said sexual orientation discrimination was a form of sex discrimination.

      Equally surprising was that the decision was written by President Donald Trump's first Supreme Court appointee ...

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      Mentions: Civil Rights
    20. Trump Faces Backlash Over Juneteenth Rally

      Trump Faces Backlash Over Juneteenth Rally

      President Donald Trump was hit with strong backlash Thursday over his decision to hold a campaign rally next week on Juneteenth, a holiday marking the end of slavery, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the site of one of the deadliest race riots in American history, in 1921.

      Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, said the decision to hold a rally there on June 19 "is disrespectful to the lives and community that was lost during the Tulsa race riot."

      "This was a massacre of innocent Black inhabitants by White supremacists in a span of 24 hours," Bass said in a statement to NBC News.

      Read Full Article
    21. Georgia to Investigate Election 'Catastrophe'

      Georgia to Investigate Election 'Catastrophe'

      Hourslong waits, problems with new voting machines and a lack of available ballots plagued voters in majority minority counties in Georgia on Tuesday — conditions the secretary of state called "unacceptable" and vowed to investigate.

      Democrats and election watchers said voting issues in a state that has been plagued for years by similar problems, along with allegations of racial bias, didn't bode well for the November presidential election, when Georgia could be in play.

      "This seems to be happening throughout Atlanta and perhaps throughout the county. People have been in line since before 7:00 am this morning," Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, a Democrat, tweeted shortly after polls were supposed to open — and in some cases still hadn't.

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    22. Democrats Unveil Police Reform Bill Amid Protests

      Democrats Unveil Police Reform Bill Amid Protests

      House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and other top Democrats in the House and the Senate on Monday unveiled far-reaching legislation to overhaul policing in the United States as protests over excessive force by law enforcement against African Americans and others have gripped the nation.

      The bill, called the “Justice in Policing Act,” would ban chokeholds, including the kind used by a then-Minneapolis police officer in the death of George Floyd last month, as well as no-knock warrants in drug cases, as was used in the incident leading to the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, in March, according to a a House Democratic aide and a bill summary obtained by NBC News.

      The legislation, which has more than ...

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      Mentions: Civil Rights
    23. Derek Chauvin's Wife Files for Divorce and Wants No Spousal Support

      Derek Chauvin's Wife Files for Divorce and Wants No Spousal Support

      The estranged wife of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin intends to change her name and doesn't want any spousal support, her divorce petition revealed on Monday.

      Kellie May Chauvin, 45, filed for divorce on Saturday, a day after her 44-year-old husband of nearly 10 years, was arrested and charged with third-degree murder in the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody last week.

      The eight-page divorce petition, which was made public on Monday, revealed few details of the union, beyond basic language that "there has been an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage relationship of the parties within the definition of" Minnesota statutes.

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    24. Following Autopsy Results, George Floyd's Family is Assured Other Officers 'Will Be Charged'

      Following Autopsy Results, George Floyd's Family is Assured Other Officers 'Will Be Charged'

      The attorney for George Floyd's family, Ben Crump, said Tuesday that authorities have told them the other three officers involved in the detainment that preceded his death will be charged.

      Former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, who kneeled on Floyd's neck for nearly 9 minutes as he exclaimed "I can't breathe," has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. The three other officers involved in the incident, two of whom restrained Floyd's lower body and one of whom stood by as the horrific scene unfolded, have been fired but not charged.

      "We heard that they expect to charge those officers," Crump said on the "TODAY" show Tuesday. "And now with the autopsy, the independent autopsy ...

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