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    1. Study Finds Shutdowns Prevented 60 Million Coronavirus Infections

      Study Finds Shutdowns Prevented 60 Million Coronavirus Infections

      Shutdown orders prevented about 60 million novel coronavirus infections in the United States and 285 million in China, according to a research study published Monday that examined how stay-at-home orders and other restrictions limited the spread of the contagion.

      A separate study from epidemiologists at Imperial College London estimated the shutdowns saved about 3.1 million lives in 11 European countries, including 500,000 in the United Kingdom, and dropped infection rates by an average of 82 percent, sufficient to drive the contagion well below epidemic levels.

      The two reports, published simultaneously Monday in the journal Nature, used completely different methods to reach similar conclusions. They suggest that the aggressive and unprecedented shutdowns, which caused massive economic disruptions and job ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    2. Biden to Meet with Family of George Floyd in Houston

      Biden to Meet with Family of George Floyd in Houston

      Joe Biden is planning to meet privately with George Floyd’s family in Houston on Monday, offering condolences in the aftermath of a killing that launched nationwide protests over police brutality and systemic racism.

      Biden is also recording a video message that will play at the funeral, according to his campaign. He is not planning to attend the service himself, citing his Secret Service detail and not wanting to disrupt the service.

      The trip to Houston came after several days of internal discussions over what role the former vice president should play in the funerals. Over the course of his career, he has delivered eulogies for a wide variety of people.

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    3. New York City, Once the U.S. Epicenter of Coronavirus, Eyes June Reopening

      New York City, Once the U.S. Epicenter of Coronavirus, Eyes June Reopening

      Officials in New York City, which was once the U.S. epicenter of the coronavirus, are making plans to lift restrictions as the number of new cases there levels off. Mayor Bill de Blasio outlined a possible phased approach, which he expects to begin in the first half of June, with “anywhere from 200,000 to 400,000” people returning to work in the first phase.

      Four months after the first novel coronavirus infection was confirmed in the United States, the virus has claimed more than 100,000 lives here. It has killed people in every state. It has found victims in dense cities and rural towns. Some of the victims were well-known; many were unsung.

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    4. More Evidence Emerges on Why Covid-19 is So Much Worse Than the Flu

      More Evidence Emerges on Why Covid-19 is So Much Worse Than the Flu

      Researchers who examined the lungs of patients killed by covid-19 found evidence that it attacks the lining of blood vessels there, a critical difference from the lungs of people who died of the flu, according to a report published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

      Critical parts of the lungs of patients infected by the novel coronavirusalso suffered many microscopic blood clots and appeared to respond to the attack by growing tiny new blood vessels, the researchers reported.

      The observations in a small number of autopsied lungs buttress reports from physicians treating covid-19 patients. Doctors have described widespread damage to blood vessels and the presence of blood clots that would not be expected in a respiratory disease.

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    5. D.C. Attorney General Reaches Settlement with Greyhound Over Union Station Bus Idling

      D.C. Attorney General Reaches Settlement with Greyhound Over Union Station Bus Idling

      D.C. Attorney General Karl A. Racine said Thursday that the city had reached a $125,000 settlement with Greyhound Lines after suing the bus company over vehicles idling at Union Station.

      In December, Racine filed a lawsuit in D.C. Superior Court seeking $216,000 in penalties after his office and the District’s Department of Energy and Environment said they found 50 Greyhound buses idling at Union Station with engines ­running longer than the three-minute legal limit.

      On Thursday, the attorney general’s office said a settlement was reached and that Greyhound would be required to pay $125,000 in fines, hire a supervisor to monitor idling at Union Station and prohibit excessive bus idling nationwide.

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    6. All 50 States Ease Restrictions as U.S. Death Toll Surpasses 90,000

      All 50 States Ease Restrictions as U.S. Death Toll Surpasses 90,000

      Ready or not, the United States is reopening. All 50 states have started easing coronavirus-related restrictions — despite many of them not meeting federal benchmarks for reopening — leading public health experts to warn that a new surge of infections could be imminent. As the U.S. death toll surpassed 90,000, White House officials continued to defend the push to reopen and optimistically predicted a swift economic recovery.

      Meanwhile, President Trump said it’s “a badge of honor” that America leads the world with more than 1.5 million confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus because “it means our testing is much better,” he said Tuesday. Trump noted that “we’re also a much bigger country than most.” The United States ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    7. Vaccine Expert Warns of ‘Darkest Winter in Modern History’ Without Coordinated U.S. Response

      Vaccine Expert Warns of ‘Darkest Winter in Modern History’ Without Coordinated U.S. Response

      Rick Bright, a former top U.S. vaccine official, will testify before Congress on Thursday that the United States faces the “darkest winter in modern history” — with “unprecedented illness and fatalities” — if federal officials don’t develop a more coordinated coronavirus response before an expected resurgence later this year.

      Bright alleged in a recent whistleblower complaint that he was demoted for prioritizing “science and safety over political expediency” and for raising concerns over a drug repeatedly pushed by President Trump as a possible cure for the novel coronavirus.

      In Wisconsin, the state Supreme Court’s conservative majority struck down a stay-at-home order extension issued by Gov. Tony Evers, limiting the Democratic governor’s rulemaking power. Some counties and major cities ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    8. Democrats Move to Allow Remote Voting or a Virtual Summer Convention

      Democrats Move to Allow Remote Voting or a Virtual Summer Convention

      The Democratic Party plans to adopt new rules Tuesday to narrow the scope of its presidential nominating convention, potentially paving the way for either a limited in-person gathering or a virtual event this August.

      The proposed changes, which are expected to be adopted in virtual meeting of the party’s rules and bylaws committee, would allow delegates to participate even if they do not attend the convention in person. No final decision on the convention is expected to be made in coming weeks as organizers await a decision by federal, state and local health officials.

      The convention had originally been planned for July in Milwaukee, but was moved back a month in hopes that restrictions forced by the coronavirus pandemic ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    9. States Begin to Lift Coronavirus Restrictions; Trump Will Temporarily Suspend Immigration

      States Begin to Lift Coronavirus Restrictions; Trump Will Temporarily Suspend Immigration

      President Trump said he will sign an executive order to temporarily suspend immigration to the United States, citing “the attack from the Invisible Enemy” and “the need to protect” American jobs. Such a ban would be unprecedented in U.S. history.

      Meanwhile, as some European and Asian nations loosen coronavirus lockdowns and gradually reopen businesses, the Republican governors of Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee said they will scale back restrictions in their states. The announcements came amid a deepening national debate over potentially exacerbating a public health crisis to revive the shattered economy.

      Most Americans say it could be June or later before it will be safe for larger gatherings to take place again, according to a new Washington Post-University ...
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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    10. ‘Disaster Waiting to Happen’: Thousands of Inmates Released as Prisons Face Coronavirus

      ‘Disaster Waiting to Happen’: Thousands of Inmates Released as Prisons Face Coronavirus

      Amid fears that the coronavirus will carve a deadly path through prisons and jails, counties and states are releasing thousands of inmates — New Jersey alone began freeing hundreds of people this week — and the federal prison system is coming under intense pressure to take similar measures.

      Public health and corrections officials have issued dire warnings that cramped and unsanitary conditions could turn prisons into a haven for the virus, endangering not just inmates but also corrections officers and prison health-care workers as well as their families and communities.

      Criminal-justice reform advocates from across the political spectrum urged President Trump on Tuesday to use his clemency power to commute the sentences of inmates eligible for “compassionate release” and others who could ...

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      Mentions: Coronavirus
    11. Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire Democratic Primary

      Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire Democratic Primary

      Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) claimed unchallenged control of the Democratic Party's left wing with a victory in the New Hampshire presidential primary Tuesday as two moderates, Pete Butti­gieg and a newly surging Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), vied for the opposition mantle in a campaign that has been remade over the past eight days.

      Sanders and Buttigieg, a former mayor of South Bend, Ind., marked their second straight strong showings — they essentially tied in last week's Iowa caucuses, with Sanders carrying the popular vote and Buttigieg winning a slight edge in delegates.

      "Let me say tonight that this victory here is the beginning of the end for Donald Trump," Sanders told his supporters. He praised his opponents, including ...

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    12. Prosecutors Appear to Back Away from Prison Recommendation for Michael Flynn

      Prosecutors Appear to Back Away from Prison Recommendation for Michael Flynn

      Prosecutors backed away from their recommendation that former national security adviser Michael Flynn serve up to six months in prison, saying in a court filing Wednesday that probation remained a “reasonable sentence” that they would not oppose.

      The filing comes as Flynn continues his effort to withdraw his guilty plea in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia probe. Prosecutors did not explain in their filing why they reemphasized probation as a reasonable sentence for Flynn.

      The shift represents the latest turn in the case in which federal prosecutors once held up Flynn as a model cooperator and suggested probation but shifted their stance to include prison time after Flynn hired a new defense team, attacked investigators and undermined ...

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    13. McConnell Tells Republican Senators He Does Not Yet Have the Votes Yet to Block Witnesses

      McConnell Tells Republican Senators He Does Not Yet Have the Votes Yet to Block Witnesses

      Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) indicated in a closed-door meeting with Senate Republicans that he did not yet have enough votes to defeat an effort, expected later this week, to call additional witnesses and evidence in President Trump’s impeachment trial.

      Pressure has ramped up to include witnesses after reports that former national security adviser John Bolton says in a book manuscript that Trump directly tied the holdup of nearly $400 million in military assistance to Ukraine to investigations of former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden.

      Trump’s defense team argued Tuesday that Democrats are seeking to remove him from office over policy differences as they offered their third and final day of opening arguments ...

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    14. Democrats Use Trump’s Allies Against him in Impeachment Case

      Democrats Use Trump’s Allies Against him in Impeachment Case

      There are more than 80 current members of Congress who also cast votes in the impeachment trial of Bill Clinton 20 years ago. That’s scores of politicians who were asked their opinions about impeaching a Democratic president and who now are asked their opinions about impeaching a Republican.

      Needless to say, those positions are not always consistent.

      President Trump’s allies have used this to great effect. Back then, Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) derided a “an impeachment substantially supported by one of our major political parties and largely opposed by the other” as “lack[ing] legitimacy.” That has been highlighted recently by Republicans such as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.). After all, that phrasing could easily describe ...

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    15. Drugstore chains sue doctors in federal opioid case

      Drugstore chains sue doctors in federal opioid case

      Many of the opioid drugmaker  defendants involved in the opioid multi-district litigation have sued doctors across Ohio claiming that physicians are the true culprits in the nation's opioid crisis. 

      Major chains such as CVS, Walgreen CO., Walmart, Rite Aid and others claim that opioid prescribers aka physicians bear the burden of responsibility for the opioid epidemic although the physicians are not set to defend themselves in trial this coming October against Summit and Cuyahoga counties. 

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    16. Senate Adopts Ground Rules for Impeachment Trial

      Senate Adopts Ground Rules for Impeachment Trial

      The first substantive day of President Trump’s impeachment trial opened Tuesday with unexpected internal GOP dissension over its structure, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) was forced to revise his proposed rules at the last minute to accommodate a brewing rebellion in his ranks.

      That abrupt reversal from Senate leadership began a deeply acrimonious day in the chamber, which dramatically escalated in its final hours when the House managers and the president’s attorneys engaged in language considered so toxic for the staid Senate that Chief Justice John Roberts, who is presiding over the trial, admonished both sides.

      In the end, the final parameters of the third impeachment trial of a U.S. president was approved on strictly ...

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    17. A billion pills in less than a decade: The American opioid epidmeic

      A billion pills in less than a decade: The American opioid epidmeic

      Newly released federal drug data shows that more than 24 billion doses were shipped throughout the nation within less than a decade between 2006-2014. 

      The newly disclosed data illustrates the paths opioids took throughout the nation to create the epidemic we know today. 

      Peter J. Mougey, counsel for Plaintiffs in Florida examined that the excess of billions is jaw dropping and explains how the epidemic has negatively affected every city in the nation. 

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    18. House Managers Deliver Impeachment Articles to Senate

      House Managers Deliver Impeachment Articles to Senate

      The House on Wednesday delivered articles of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate and approved seven Democrats to serve as prosecutors in the third trial of a U.S. president.

      House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) signed the articles at a ceremony in the Capitol, hours after she named a team of managers led by two trusted lieutenants, Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.) and Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.).

      The managers then walked the articles across the Capitol and presented them to the chamber led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who has repeatedly characterized the House case as weak.

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    19. Who Are the Impeachment Managers in the Senate Trial?

      Who Are the Impeachment Managers in the Senate Trial?

      House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named the lawmakers who will prosecute the case in a Senate trial that will begin in earnest next week. In impeachment parlance, they are known as managers. They are tasked with persuading 67 senators to convict Trump and remove him from office on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

      “The emphasis is on litigators, the emphasis is on comfort in the courtroom,” Pelosi said of her selections.

      Here’s who they are and why Pelosi probably picked them for the most consequential part of the entire impeachment process.

      • Adam B. Schiff, House Intelligence Committee chairman and lead manager. 
      • Jerrold Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee

      • Zoe Lofgren, chair of the House Committee ...

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    20. Democratic Debate Highlights

      Democratic Debate Highlights

      For two hours, six Democratic presidential candidates focused on issues of foreign policy, healthcare and the question of electability — particularly the issue of whether a woman could defeat President Trump —in the last primary debate before Iowa caucuses on Feb. 3.

      On stage were former vice president Joe Biden; former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete Buttigieg; Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.); Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.); investor Tom Steyer; and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.).

      Foreign policy: In light of escalating tensions between the United States and Iran, the debate launched headfirst into foreign policy.

      Health care: As it had in nearly every one of the previous Democratic debates, health care featured prominently.

      Gender and electability: Forty-five minutes in, moderators finally poked at ...

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    21. White House Wants to Change Environmental Rules to Speed Up Projects

      White House Wants to Change Environmental Rules to Speed Up Projects

      The White House is moving to exempt projects without significant federal funding from environmental reviews that have been required for 50 years, a major shift that would make it easier to build mines, expand airports and lay pipelines, among other things, according to three people familiar with the proposal.

      The individuals spoke on the condition of anonymity because President Trump is expected to unveil the plan Thursday morning.

      The proposed changes would narrow the scope of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires federal agencies to assess the impact of a major project before a spade of dirt is turned and to include the public in the process.

      Environmental groups, tribal activists and others have used the law to ...

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    22. First black justice takes seat on Delaware’s Supreme Court

      First black justice takes seat on Delaware’s Supreme Court

      The newest member of Delaware’s Supreme Court is also the first black justice in the history of the state’s highest court. Delaware State News reported Monday that Tamika Montgomery-Reeves is also believed to be the youngest member of the Supreme Court since it was officially established in 1951.

      Montgomery-Reeves is a native of Mississippi who attended law school in Georgia and now lives in Wilmington. She clerked for William B. Chandler III, head of Delaware’s highly influential Court of Chancery, which handles many of the nation’s business-related cases.

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    23. Mercedes reaches $20M settlement with federal auto safety agency

      Mercedes reaches $20M settlement with federal auto safety agency

      Mercedes-Benz has agreed to pay $13 million to the nation’s top highway safety regulator to resolve an investigation into how the luxury German automaker handled recalls on defective cars.

      The company also faces $7 million in additional penalties if it doesn’t meet the terms of a settlement with the government.

      The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began the investigation that led to the settlement last year. The agency concluded that Mercedes missed deadlines in the recall process on multiple occasions.

      It’s the first penalty the agency has issued to an automaker under the Trump administration.

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    24. Afghanistan food supplier keeps lucrative contract despite massive fraud settlement

      Afghanistan food supplier keeps lucrative contract despite massive fraud settlement

      The U.S. military is allowing its primary supplier of food and water for troops in Afghanistan to continue doing business with the military even though fraud charges against three former executives resulted in a $45 million settlement.

      Dubai-based logistics company Anham is at least the third supplier for the Defense Logistics Agency’s primary Afghan troop supply contract to be involved in massive fraud allegations. Anham’s former Virginia-based subsidiary, Unitrans International, agreed to pay the settlement last week to resolve federal criminal and civil complaints of obstruction and making false claims.

      The settlement highlights how the U.S. military effort in Afghanistan, which has stretched for nearly two decades and cost taxpayers at least $1 trillion, has consistently ...

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