1. Articles from abcnews.go.com

  2. 1-24 of 44 1 2 »
    1. Some States Face Resistance from Police to Enforce Mask Mandates

      Some States Face Resistance from Police to Enforce Mask Mandates

      Lang Holland, the chief of police in tiny Marshall, Arkansas, said he thinks the threat of the coronavirus has been overstated and only wears a face mask if he's inside a business that requires them. He doesn't make his officers wear them either. So the day after Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed an order requiring masks to be worn in public throughout Arkansas, Holland made it clear his department wasn't going to enforce the mandate in the Ozarks town of about 1,300, calling it an unconstitutional overreach. “All I'm saying is if you want to wear a mask, you have the freedom to choose that," said Holland, who said he supports President Donald Trump. “It ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    2. Target, CVS, and Publix Join Retail Chains in Mask Requirement

      Target, CVS, and Publix Join Retail Chains in Mask Requirement

      Target, CVS Health and Publix Super Markets on Thursday joined the growing list of national chains that will require customers to wear face masks regardless of where cities or states stand on the issue.

      Target's mandatory face mask policy will go into effect Aug. 1, and all CVS stores will begin requiring them on Monday. Publix Super Markets Inc., based in Lakeland, Florida, said that its rule will kick in on Tuesday at all 1,200 stores.

      More than 80% of Target’s 1,800 stores already require customers to wear masks due to local and state regulations. Target will hand out masks at entrances to those who need them.

      The announcements come one day after the nation's ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Florida
    3. DeVos Faces Backlash After Demanding Schools Reopen Full-Time

      DeVos Faces Backlash After Demanding Schools Reopen Full-Time

      Education Secretary Betsy DeVos faced backlash Monday for demanding that schools reopen for full-time in-person instruction in the fall -- even in places where the virus is surging in the American South and West and without offering a specific plan on how to do so safely -- and doubling down on a threat to cut funding to schools that don't.

      "American investment in education is a promise to students and their families. If schools aren't going to reopen and not fulfill that promise, they shouldn't get the funds, and give it to the families to decide to go to a school that is going to meet that promise," DeVos told "Fox News Sunday."

      "There's going to be the ...

      Read Full Article
    4. Tulsa Health Official Says Trump's Rally Likely Contributed to Surge

      Tulsa Health Official Says Trump's Rally Likely Contributed to Surge

      President Donald Trump's campaign rally in late June, as well as the accompanying counterprotests, likely contributed to the area's recent spike in coronavirus cases, Tulsa City-County Health Department Director Dr. Bruce Dart said Wednesday.

      "In the past few days, we've seen almost 500 new cases, and we had several large events just over two weeks ago, so I guess we just connect the dots," Dart said at a press conference.

      Dart, who said prior to the rally he'd recommended it be postponed over health concerns, added on Wednesday that "significant events in the past few weeks" had "more than likely contributed" to Tulsa County's surge in cases.

      Tulsa County reported 261 new cases on Tuesday ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    5. Remains of Fort Hood Soldier, Vanessa Guillen, Have Been Identified

      Remains of Fort Hood Soldier, Vanessa Guillen, Have Been Identified

      The Army has identified the remains of missing Fort Hood soldier Vanessa Guillen, her family's lawyer said in a statement Sunday evening.

      Guillen, 20, was last seen in a parking lot on the Texas Army base on April 22, according to military officials. On June 30, investigators said they found unidentified human remains about 20 miles away from the Killeen, Texas, base.

      "The Army has confirmed that the bones, hair and other remains found are Vanessa Guillen," attorney Natalie Khawam said Sunday in the statement. "We are at a loss for words."

      The Army Criminal Investigation Division has yet to independently confirm the identification. ABC News has reached out to Army CID for comment.

      Read Full Article
    6. Testing Delays Occur as Coronavirus Cases Spike

      Testing Delays Occur as Coronavirus Cases Spike

      As COVID-19 test positivity rates resurged in recent weeks, private test providers have made efforts to sound the alarm that the rising demand for testing may outpace their ability to process the new influx without accumulating a backlog. The development is eerily reminiscent of initial coronavirus testing failures in the U.S. when the pandemic first hit earlier this year.

      Despite massive increases in the ability to process COVID-19 tests across the country in recent months, in the last week, two of the top commercial testing labs -- Quest Diagnostics and LabCorp -- both said their testing capacity is under strain amid coronavirus outbreaks that hit predominantly southern and western states hardest.

      In a statement last week, Quest Diagnostics said that while ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    7. FBI Cautions Fraudulent COVID-19 Antibody Tests

      FBI Cautions Fraudulent COVID-19 Antibody Tests

      The Federal Bureau of Investigation is warning of fraudulent COVID-19 antibody tests.

      While real tests indicate whether or not an individual was previously infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, the FBI warns the false tests are not only a method for scammers to give out fraudulent results but also to steal personal information from people who take the fake tests.

      Scammers, according to the FBI, are also looking for insurance and Medicare information, "which can be used in future medical insurance or identity theft schemes."

      The FBI urges the public to be aware of "claims of FDA approval for antibody testing that cannot be verified, advertisements for antibody testing through social media platforms, email, telephone calls, online, or from ...

      Read Full Article
    8. Judge Threatens to Move Trial in George Floyd Death

      Judge Threatens to Move Trial in George Floyd Death

      A Minnesota judge on Monday warned that he's likely to move the trials of four former police officers charged in George Floyd's death out of Minneapolis if public officials, attorneys and family members don't stop speaking out about the case.

      Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill stopped short of issuing a gag order against attorneys on both sides, but he said he likely will if public statements continue that make it hard to find an impartial jury. Cahill said that would also make him likely to grant a change-of-venue motion if one is filed, as he anticipates.

      “The court is not going to be happy about hearing comments on these three areas: merits, evidence and guilt or innocence ...
      Read Full Article
    9. Pelosi Leads Push to Strengthen Obamacare Amid Trump's Opposition

      Pelosi Leads Push to Strengthen Obamacare Amid Trump's Opposition

      Flicking a dismissive jab at President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled a plan Wednesday to expand “Obamacare," even as Trump's administration is about to file arguments in a Supreme Court case to strike it down.

      Pelosi announced an upcoming floor vote on her measure, setting up a debate that will juxtapose the Democrats' top policy issue, Trump's unrelenting efforts to dismantle Obama's legacy, and the untamed coronavirus pandemic.

      On Thursday, the Trump administration is expected to file papers with the Supreme Court arguing that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional. Pelosi wants her bill on the House floor Monday.
      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    10. Texas Children's Hospital Accepting Adult Patients Amid Pandemic Rise

      Texas Children's Hospital Accepting Adult Patients Amid Pandemic Rise

      The rise in new COVID-19 cases in Texas has gotten so taxing that a children's hospital in Houston is now admitting adult patients. The Texas Children's Hospital said it opened up its intensive care unit and acute care-beds to adults who are suffering from the virus. Houston has 14,322 confirmed cases to date and over the last two weeks has seen a record number of new daily cases that average over 200 a day, according to the Houston Health Department.

       The city has seen 196 deaths from the virus so far, according to Health Department data.

      "We are committed to doing our part to assist the city as the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise," a ...

      Read Full Article
    11. Biden Commits to 3 Debates, Criticizes Trump's Request for More

      Biden Commits to 3 Debates, Criticizes Trump's Request for More

      Former vice president Joe Biden’s campaign has agreed to three scheduled debates with President Donald Trump this fall, and in a letter sent to the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) Monday by campaign manager Jen O’Malley Dillon, criticized what she said was Trump’s shifting stance on how many debates in which he's willing to participate.

      In the letter, O’Malley Dillon writes that Biden, once formally invited by the commissioner after he officially becomes the Democratic nominee later this summer, will participate in three CPD-commissioned debates slated for Sept. 29, Oct. 15 and Oct. 22.

      Biden’s campaign manager cautioned that the campaign was accepting the invitation on the parameters previously laid out by the commission ...

      Read Full Article
    12. A Dozen States Set Record High COVID-19 Cases Since Friday

      A Dozen States Set Record High COVID-19 Cases Since Friday

      A dozen states have seen record highs of new COVID-19 cases since Friday, an ABC News analysis has found.

      The states that saw the increase were Florida, Texas, Utah, South Carolina, Nevada, Georgia, Missouri, Montana, Arizona, California, Tennessee and Oklahoma, according to the analysis of state-released data compiled by the COVID Tracking Project. Florida's three-day streak of record-breaking numbers ended on Saturday, with 4,049 new cases of COVID-19.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Florida Breaking
    13. California Mandates Wearing of Masks

      California Mandates Wearing of Masks

      California on Thursday started requiring people throughout the state to wear masks in most indoor settings and outdoors when distancing isn't possible as the coronavirus continues to spread.

      “Science shows that face coverings and masks work,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a statement about the new order. “They are critical to keeping those who are around you safe, keeping businesses open and restarting our economy.”

      States including Michigan, New York, Maine, Delaware and Maryland already have statewide mask orders in place.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    14. Former Officer Charged With Felony Murder in Rayshard Brooks Shooting

      Former Officer Charged With Felony Murder in Rayshard Brooks Shooting

      A former Atlanta police officer is facing charges including felony murder and aggravated assault after fatally shooting Rayshard Brooks in a Wendy's parking lot last week, prosecutors said Wednesday.

      Brooks, a black man, "was running away at the time that the shot was fired" by Officer Garrett Rolfe, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard Jr. said.

      "At the time Mr. Brooks was shot," Howard said, "he did not pose an immediate threat of death or serious physical injury."

      Read Full Article
    15. House to Vote on Making Washington DC 51st State

      House to Vote on Making Washington DC 51st State

      Democrats controlling the House have slated a vote next week to make the District of Columbia the 51st state, an issue that they say has become far more important in the aftermath of protests for racial justice in both Washington and across the nation.

      Next Friday’s vote, if successful, would pass a D.C. statehood bill for the first time in the House, but the legislation faces insurmountable opposition in the GOP-controlled Senate. It comes even as the COVID-19 pandemic has forced delays in the consideration of most other legislation. More than enough lawmakers are officially backing the bill for it to pass. In 1993, the Democratic-controlled Congress defeated a D.C. statehood bill by an almost 2-1 margin ...

      Read Full Article
    16. Nursing Home Faces Lawsuit After Army Veteran Dies from Covid-19

      Nursing Home Faces Lawsuit After Army Veteran Dies from Covid-19

      A grieving family has filed a lawsuit against Hollywood Premier Healthcare Center, a skilled nursing home in California, after their loved one died from COVID-19.

      Vincent Martin, an 84-year-old Army veteran, died on April 4 and his daughters, Elizabeth Gagliano and Kathryn Sessinghaus, and his wife, Emma Martin, are alleging in a lawsuit that the facility mishandled the novel coronavirus outbreak, leading to Martin's death.

      With at least 16 residents dead, 72 positive cases among residents and 37 cases among staff, the facility, formerly known as Serrano North Convalescent Hospital, has become one of the worst-hit nursing homes in the country as the pandemic continued to spread.
      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    17. Passengers Sue Celebrity Over 'Heightened Risk' of COVID-19 Exposure

      Passengers Sue Celebrity Over 'Heightened Risk' of COVID-19 Exposure

      The lawsuit claims that Celebrity became aware that someone aboard the vessel was displaying symptoms "consistent with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis" at the beginning of the voyage, but that Celebrity still allowed a "full schedule of entertainment activities and dining options," including buffet-style meals.

      During their trip, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a no-sail order because "the CDC Director (had) reason to believe that cruise ship travel may continue to introduce, transmit, or spread COVID-19."

      The Kantrows said they didn't know something was wrong until a day after the no-sail order was issued, when their ship was forced to head to San Diego after being denied the ability to dock in Chile on March 15.

      Read Full Article
    18. Virus Rules Tighten Illegal Immigration on Northern Border

      Virus Rules Tighten Illegal Immigration on Northern Border

      Five Mexican citizens apprehended this week after illegally entering the United States in remote northern Maine were returned to Canada within hours under a rule put into place as part of the U.S. government response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

      A similar policy by the Canadian government allows the return to the United States of most people seeking asylum in Canada.

      While the restrictions haven't ended illegal immigration into the United States from Canada, the emergency policy has all but ended the use of Roxham Road in Champlain, New York — one of the most well-known routes used by people fleeing the U.S. to seek asylum in Canada.

       

      Read Full Article
    19. Supreme Court Sides with Lucky Brand in Trademark Dispute

      Supreme Court Sides with Lucky Brand in Trademark Dispute

      The Supreme Court is siding with fashion brand Lucky in a dispute with a Miami-based apparel manufacturer that owns the “Get Lucky” trademark. The high court ruled unanimously in favor of Lucky on Thursday and against Marcel Fashion Group. 

      The case before the justices comes after a series of lawsuits between Lucky, which is based in Los Angeles, and Marcel going back nearly two decades. Lucky owns trademarks related to its name but not to “Get Lucky,” which Marcel has had for use on clothing since 1986. 

      After Lucky ran advertisements in the late 1990s and early 2000s using the phrase “Get Lucky,” Marcel sued. The two settled, but in 2005 there was a second lawsuit between the parties. A ...

      Read Full Article
    20. Democrats Want $500B More in Crisis Relief, Setting up Senate Showdown

      Democrats Want $500B More in Crisis Relief, Setting up Senate Showdown

      House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Wednesday called for half a trillion dollars in additional financial aid to boost local and state governments, small businesses, food stamp recipients and hospitals struggling amid the coronavirus pandemic.

      Their request comes in response to the Trump administration’s call for more than $250 billion to help ailing small businesses. “The heartbreaking acceleration of the coronavirus crisis demands bold, urgent and ongoing action from Congress to protect Americans’ lives and livelihoods,” Pelosi and Schumer said in a joint statement Wednesday.

      Pelosi and Schumer’s request tops $500 billion, with $250 billion going to small businesses with half of the funds going to those businesses owned and operated by women ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    21. Judge Rejects Government's Bid to Block $360M Airline-Data Merger

      Judge Rejects Government's Bid to Block $360M Airline-Data Merger

      A federal judge has rejected a government attempt to block Sabre Corp. from buying Farelogix Inc. in a $360 million deal combining two companies that provide information about airline tickets to travel agents.

      U.S. District Court Judge Leonard Stark in Delaware said in a ruling late Tuesday that the Justice Department had failed during an eight-day trial to prove that the deal would substantially reduce competition. The Justice Department sued to block the deal last August. It accused Sabre of buying Farelogix to eliminate a competitor who had more modern technology, and said a merger would lead to higher prices and less innovation.

      Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim said the government will review the ruling and consider how to ...

      Read Full Article
    22. Law Enforcement Warns Americans of Increasing Coronavirus Scams

      Law Enforcement Warns Americans of Increasing Coronavirus Scams

      Law enforcement officials are seeing increased efforts by scammers looking to take advantage of the novel coronavirus pandemic to prey on U.S. consumers, according to the FBI and other agencies.

      The Federal Communications Commission in the past week has sought to raise awareness by releasing several examples of spam calls that have circulated since the virus spread in the U.S.

      "If you want to receive a free testing kit delivered overnight to your home, press 1," a voice on one of the calls says. "Protect your loved ones from the coronavirus."

      Another example showed a suspected scammer trying to advertise a cleaning service that purported to eliminate the virus from the air in Americans' homes.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Coronavirus
    23. $143M Natural Gas Explosion Settlement Approved

      $143M Natural Gas Explosion Settlement Approved

      A Massachusetts judge approved a $143 million class action settlement Thursday for residents and business owners affected by natural gas explosions in Massachusetts in 2018. 

      The settlement's approval comes days after Columbia Gas of Massachusetts pleaded guilty to causing the explosions that killed one person, injured dozens of others, and damaged or destroyed more than 100 buildings.

      “This community suffered greatly in the wake of the explosions, and the compensation that residents and businesses will receive from this settlement will go a long way in healing the Merrimack Valley,” the lawyers leading the class action suit said in a statement.

      Columbia Gas is also on the hook for a $53 million criminal fine — the largest ever imposed for breaking ...

      Read Full Article
    24. Former Police Officer Sentenced to 40 Years to Life for Murder

      Former Police Officer Sentenced to 40 Years to Life for Murder

      A former Los Angeles Police Department officer was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison for the murder of a 23-year-old man.

      Henry Solis said he was acting in self-defense while attempting to arrest Salome Rodriguez on March 13, 2015, in Pomona, California, for an alleged assault and robbery, according to court documents.

      Police at the time of the shooting said Solis and Rodriguez got into an altercation that escalated after Solis pursued the other man on foot and fired multiple shots.

      But prosecutors with the Los Angeles District Attorney's Office said Solis pursued Rodriguez as he walked past him outside an unnamed bar, opened fire and killed Rodriguez, according to a statement issued on Wednesday after the ...

      Read Full Article
    1-24 of 44 1 2 »
  1. Categories

    1. News.Law Categories:

      Big Law, Civil Plaintiff, Consumer Law, Coronavirus, Criminal Law, Drug Safety, Employment Safety, Opioids, Political and Legislative, Product safety, Securities, Special Topic, Trucking
    2. Targo:

      F-NRA, Gun Violence