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    1. Mentioned In 62 Articles

    2. Newly disclosed audit revealed military hospitals issues dangerous amounts of opioids

      Newly disclosed audit revealed military hospitals issues dangerous amounts of opioids
      A new report shows that U.S. military hospitals overprescribed opioids to patients with alleged chronic pain from 2015-2017. Despite an ongoing opioid crisis, there were no apparent policies or procedures in place to track prescription rates until 2017. The report provided that the military facilities did not "prevent prescribers from prescribing unusually high doses of opioids."
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    3. The cure to the opioid epidemic is unaffordable

      The cure to the opioid epidemic is unaffordable
      While methadone has been proven to help people escape opioid addiction, many cannot afford it. Methadone clinics provide medication to help keep off cravings. However, no matter the success rate, the price exceeds what the average middle class American can pay. Methadone clinic prices range from $300-$500 a month when health insurance policies do not help cover the costs which is often the case.
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    4. A billion pills in less than a decade: The American opioid epidmeic

      A billion pills in less than a decade: The American opioid epidmeic
      Newly released federal drug data shows that more than 24 billion doses were shipped throughout the nation within less than a decade between 2006-2014. The newly disclosed data illustrates the paths opioids took throughout the nation to create the epidemic we know today. Peter J. Mougey, counsel for Plaintiffs in Florida examined that the excess of billions is jaw dropping and explains how the epidemic has negatively affected every city ...
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    5. Key lessons America can learn from other countries to combat the opioid crisis

      Key lessons America can learn from other countries to combat the opioid crisis
      Looking at how other countries are handling their opioid crises, some lessons become clear. Some are that guaranteed health care access may slow down the opioid epidemic, and the rules for how opioids are prescribed do matter. The more explosive opioid epidemics in other nations are in middle-low income countries. Much of their growth was fueled by U.S. companies. This was created with active lobbying and sponsored doctors. Fentanyl ...
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    6. Medicaid expansion linked to 6% decrease in opioid mortality rates

      Medicaid expansion linked to 6% decrease in opioid mortality rates
      A new study by JAMA shows that medicaid expansion which gave millions of low-income adults access to health insurance was linked to a 6 percent reduction in opioid overdose death rates. This new study disputes claims by Republican lawmakers that the medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act made the opioid crisis worse by expanding access to painkillers. This result was mostly dye to lower rates of death of heroin ...
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    7. Sentencing has now begun for ex-Insys execs

      Sentencing has now begun for ex-Insys execs
      Sentencing began Monday in the criminal trial of ex-Insys Therapeutics executives found guilty of racketeering conspiracy last May. This case was the first successful prosecution of high-ranking pharmaceutical executives linked to the opioid crisis. John Kapoor and his co-defendants were found guilty of racketeering conspiracy, a charge often utilized to prosecute drug dealers and mob bosses. Picture: AP
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    8. Sickle cell patients left in pain after ER attempts to control opioids

      Sickle cell patients left in pain after ER attempts to control opioids
      Patients suffering from sickle cell disease seeking medical help often turn to hospitals when clinics are not an option. While opioids used to be used to stop the pain, some hospitals now only give limited pain medicine. The patients claim the diluted medicine does not give the same relief as the direct injection. Hospitals are trying to strike a balance, experimenting between treating pain and overprescribing that could lead to ...
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    9. States beginning to require electronic prescriptions in 2020 amid opioid crisis

      States beginning to require electronic prescriptions in 2020 amid opioid crisis
      A new regulation in 2020 is for electronic prescriptions which have proven to be more reliable and efficient. The drugs covered are the ones with potential of abuse like opioids. The electronic prescription is sent electronically straight from the doctor to the pharmacist. Doctors claim that paper prescriptions were often high risk, with the ability for them to be forged or lost.
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    10. Studies show economic distress true cause of opioid epidemic

      Studies show economic distress true cause of opioid epidemic
      As poor and working class Americans were being affected by losing major industries, therefore jobs, they were also incidentally being affected by the opioid crisis. Studies have found a correlation between growing unemployment and opioid abuse. A study published by JAMA found that counties with automotive assembly plants that closed, after 5 years had 85 percent higher rates of opioid-overdoses compared to counties where automotive assembly plants remained open.
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    11. Synthetic opioids could cause Asian opioid epidemic within a decade

      Synthetic opioids could cause Asian opioid epidemic within a decade
      Looking at the damage fentanyl has done to the U.S. in the last decade, it is likely Asia could receive similar treatment in the next. It was only recently that it was confirmed that synthetic opioids such as fentanyl were contaminating the heroin supply in Asia in major cities. Experts say this should alarm authorities considering how deadly the synthetic opioid crisis has been in America. However, the experts ...
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    12. Study suggests that automobile plant closures linked to rise in opioid overdose deaths

      Study suggests that automobile plant closures linked to rise in opioid overdose deaths
      According to a recent study by the medical journal JAMA, an automobile plant closing in a county could contribute to 85% higher opioid overdose death rates among working-age adults after 5 years. The study used a variable of counties where automobile plants did not close and there they found the difference in the overdose death rates. The study illustrates that when economic opportunities disappear, people's economic wellbeing could adversely ...
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    13. FDA faces blame in opioid epidemic

      FDA faces blame in opioid epidemic
      A recently released report found that the Food and Drug Administration was plagued by a lack of training and oversight during the opioid crisis contributing to the epidemic that kills tens of thousands each year. The FDA may have failed to set strict enough standards and follow-through training for doctors about the risks associated with prescription opioids. A big problem was that the FDA let pharmaceutical companies develop the standards ...
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    14. New study suggests the U.S. is suffering from multiple opioid epidemics

      New study suggests the U.S. is suffering from multiple opioid epidemics
      A study by Iowa State University claims instead of one big epidemic, the United States is suffering from multiple simultaneous opioid epidemics. The study analyzed different counties from all across the country and found regional differences in the kind of opioids that cause the most overdose deaths, and considered that these differences should lead to policymakers considering varying strategies to address the epidemics. Because the opioid epidemics occur in different ...
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    15. Babies born with NAS cost the U.S. more than half a billion each year

      Babies born with NAS cost the U.S. more than half a billion each year
      The cost of babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which is opioid withdrawal due to the mother's opioid intake, amounts to over $500 million each year and 4/5ths of this money comes from medicaid. Findings published Dec. 16 in the journalJAMA Pediatrics,explain that it is clear that state and federal governments ultimately bear this billion dollar burden. Dr. Stephen Patrick, director of Vanderbilt University's Center ...
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    16. Purdue's Sackler family got $11 billion payout amid bankruptcy

      Purdue's Sackler family got $11 billion payout amid bankruptcy
      A Purdue Pharma commissioned audit introduced in Monday's bankruptcy court proceedings outlined that the family has withdrawn $12.2 billion since 2008. Approximately $10.8 of these funds were withdrawn after several company executives pled guilty to promoting misleading marketing tactics to the public. The Purdue bankruptcy proceeding has been underway since September with around two dozen state attorney generals on board with the company's settlement proposal. The ...
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